Short Film Ideas Book

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    what should the opening scenes of my short movie idea be?
    here this:i have an short film idea about seven women who attempt to break the world record for
    biggest bubblegum bubble! (under the supervision of three people from the guinness book of world
    records!)

    i've been trying to come up with the opening scenes myself,but i keep getting writer's block,so
    can you help me?

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe you can follow the "journey" of a bubblegum, from production until consumption, and end up on one of the women (or all of them, idk) buying the gum, and the competition begins. Well, I'm not really not good at putting my ideas into words, but hopefully you got a hint of what I mean :)

  2. QUESTION:
    How would I get someone to make a short-film from a story that I've written?
    I have written a short-story and would love to see it being made into a short-film but have no idea where to start or who to contact. I've have no directing or any type of film-making experience so probably would want to collaborate with someone to make the short-film...any ideas where to start?

    • ANSWER:
      You can contact your local college or other school that has script or screenwriting courses.

      What the writing needs to be formatted into is called a 'treatment' -- basically it's telling what's happening, not only with the actors, but also what the viewer is seeing (e.g. camera shots, music, whether it's an interior shot or exterior). It's really a fancy outline.

      Here's a site with some info. on treatments:
      http://www.stormforcepictures.com/writingascript-treatment.php

      Also, you can check out your local library which should have many books on this topic as well.

      Finally, consider having someone (a neutral person--not friend or family) read and critique your final treatment; if you can find someone like someone who is in the entertainment business or a professor of film that's the best.

      Good luck!
      PS: Be wary of blogs, and people phishing to steal ideas.

  3. QUESTION:
    where are the guinness book of world records headquarters are?
    here this' i've got a short film idea about seven women trying to break a record,and where the
    headquarters are will infulce where the short film will take place!

    • ANSWER:
      Guinness World Records Ltd, 3rd Floor, 184-192 Drummond Street, London, NW1 3HP.

  4. QUESTION:
    Can I make a short film for a film festival where I got the idea from a poem in a book?
    I want to make a short film to enter into a film festival. It is inspired from a poem I love in a book. Is it possible to do? If I give it credit at the end or something. Do I have to buy the rights to use it?

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    What are requirements of short films or documentaries?
    frnds plzz help ma for this.......
    i want to do it........
    then plzzz suggest some ideas,,,for short films..

    • ANSWER:
      I had an idea for a short film just the other day. I was thinking about finding an old house, like, more than 100 years old, and tell the story of the five generations of one family that lived and died in the house.

      No more than 15 minutes, and don't just shoot from the hip with a camcorder. Get yourself some lights, even if they're those crappy Lowells, and some gels, and a book called "Set Lighting." Can't remember the author, silver cover - found at Barnes & Noble.

      Have your beginning, middle and end clear-cut. (Your act 1, act 2, act 3.) Too many artsy kids think they can tell a short in some kind of neo-modern, cutting edge way and all it does is confuse the audience. If you want to show your filmmaking stuff, then do it right.

  6. QUESTION:
    Any ideas for a short story on the back-story of the magic mirror from snow white?
    So I am making a short film this summer called Mirror Man and I need some more ideas for the plot of the story.

    • ANSWER:
      There once was man named Tristan. He was a librarian to a King. He spent days and days in the massive library. Cataloging, reading, dusting the shelves. He was the happiest he had ever been. Then the King asked him to tutor his daughter, the princess. She was young, sixteen or seventeen, but this shy, quite librarian was only twenty two himself. For the next three years the two of them studied every morning and afternoon. The queen, who was jealous of her own fading beauty and her daughter's youthful glow, watched the two of them as they would lean over a book together or as he would whisper a joke to her.

      Then the king grew sick. His daughter, Princess Thorne, sat by his bedside every night. Turning to Tristan (her only true friend) for comfort as she was the apple of her father's eye. The queen grew more bold, and tried to seduce Tristan. But he rejected the queen, for his heart had already been give.

      Then, one day the queen saw Princess Thorne kiss the librarian in a fit of weakness and passion. Her anger grew, and by the next morning Thorne had been sent away to a boarding school for only girls. Tristan was let go. But, as he stormed from the throne-room he vowed to find Thorne and marry her.

      That night, the queen told the court sorcerer (her secret lover...who may or may not have had something to do with the Kings mysterious illness) to find Tristan and imprison his soul. The sorcerer followed Tristan to the inn where he was staying. As Tristan slept, the sorcerer performed an incantation where his soul would leave his body and become entrapped in a mirror hanging over his bed.

      The next morning the sorcerer presented the mirror to his queen, who hung it in her throne room. And forever more the mirror would have to answer all her questions.

      Sorry...ran out of steam towards the end...still...the story is yours if you want it!

  7. QUESTION:
    What can I do to help my group of creative film artists off the ground?
    We have 4 official members (small group of college classmates) with an array of different contacts with different abilities and talents. We've been brainstorming skits, short films, music videos, etc...but there are other things we need to get accomplished. Fund raising for example; what should we do to make money for production costs? Also, we haven't got much on feedback as to what audiences want to see from us performers, directors, artists. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Let me start with your 'feedback' question. Some audiences like to see action movies or thrillers but I think most people love to see a very good horror film. It does not have to be blood and gore. It just have to be very scary. See if you can find a book called 'Film Making" by John Russo. It will help a lot.

      As for fund raising. Well, we all have the same problem. I have a system that I use that is very good and brings in a lot of cash but takes a lot of hard work. Good luck.

  8. QUESTION:
    A good scary book to be made into a series of short films?
    A group of my friends and I are looking to recreate a scary/disturbing/crime book into a series of short films. kind of like little episodes that tell a whole story. Anyone got any ideas? We have 2 girls for main parts and any number of actors for other parts
    Oh yeah, preferably no vampire books or ones that have already been made into films

    • ANSWER:
      Cirque De Freak

  9. QUESTION:
    How many pills does it take to overdose?
    I'm making a short film for a contest.
    It's about eating disorders and depression.
    As a survivor of anorexia I just thought it was a good idea to do a movie I can relate to.
    So just generally speaking, how many pills should I put in my actress's hands?
    We're going to use rockets candy (Canadian) for pills.

    • ANSWER:
      Grab yourself a copy of MIMS. It's a large (GIANT) book of medicines that doctors use as a referral tool. You can probably get a copy that's a year out of date for free, they usually throw them in the bin. What you're looking for is the LD50. That means Lethal Dose in 50% of subjects taking the dose in question.

      The LD50 of a drug may be micrograms, milligrams, or even kilograms. Drugs come in different dosages, so asking 'how many pills' is like asking how long a piece of string is. How long did you cut the string? How high is the dose in the pills? I suggest scholar.google.com for anything academic too, less "i tookd 8 tbeletz amb i gun die lololol" posts by teenage girls being angsty.

      For opioid naive people 50 mg's of methadone will kill them, the average dose of methadone is liquid where 1 ml equals 5 mg, but tablets are available and come in 5's, 10's, 20's, etc. So five 10 mg tablets, or 3 20's, or 1 50 and you'd kill your average person. Other opioids commonly accessible and avidly demonized by the media would be things like morphine, oxycontin (oxycodone hydrochloride), vicodin (hydrocodone hydrochloride), or street heroin (diacetylmorphine). Xanax, valium, and other *pams may be a commonly used substance also, but stuff like that is usually in micrograms and the LD50 would be in grams so we're talking huuuundreds of pills to kill your character off.

      So. If depends on what kind of drug we're talking. It's feasible one tablet could kill someone. More commonly than not females OD with drugs, it's usually attention seeking and few succeed. Most fuck their liver and kidneys and have to have a colostomy bag attached to them the rest of their lives and shit in diapers, it's pretty terrible, then they also freak themselves out and never try and kill themselves again when realistically I'd rather kill myself -then- with a poop bag attached knowing no guy will ever touch me again than I would have in the first place! But I'm getting side tracked.

      In those cases chicks are usually spazzing out and being all emo so they're probably eating handfulls of paracetemol or asprin or something that any sane intelligent person would know is ineffective, hoping to make themselves really sick and look like they actually tried yet not actually trying to kill themselves.

      Foaming at the mouth and going catatonic and eventually turning yellow would be a good imitation of that kind of overdose btw. Alka Seltzer powder. Find a dye that turns yellow when exposed to the air for a few minutes if you want bonus points of being able to change someone's skin color IN ONE TAKE, but if you do that don't take the camera off them or they'll think you've just added spray tan in layers between cut scenes. That'd be ideal if you were doing something introspective first person with the ODing party on screen the entire time too. It's also possible to do that with masking in post-production if you have something like Adobe Aftereffects you can use.

      Also, if you want more realistic pills, I suggest going to any supermarket and helping yourself to the 'alternative medicine' and 'herbal remedy' aisles. There is nothing there that will actually have any impact on you medically. They do often say "DON'T TAKE MORE THAN TWO A DAY" pretending their stuff is potent, it's all just snake oil. I used to get boxes of the 'sleeping tablets' the day they expired and open presentations talking about 'quackery' and 'alternative medicine' being a giant scam that kills people by taking entire boxes of these 'do not exceed two pills per day or four per week' type herbal or alt. med 'drugs' to prove the point. People start to wig out by about your fourth or fifth box of 50 tablets. But honestly, you just poop it out, it's nothing but roots and ground up herbs that taste bad and have absolutely no affect on your body.

      Look at it this way, if alternative medicines worked they wouldn't be alternative, they'd then just be 'medicine'. They also look far more realistically like drugs that people would OD on. The only problem with this is you're sponsoring companies who exploit the stupidity of people and cash in on ignorant / innocently naive minds who turn to alternative medicine thinking it will help them. And man do they overprice their tablets filled with ground up bark. So make sure it's something cheap and easy to get lots of if you do that.

      Ok, I've ended up writing a novel here. I'm going to end this before I write your entire film for you. Good luck! Edit your question if you can and include a link to the finished film on the net when you've done it and let us know what kinda mark you get. <3

  10. QUESTION:
    what should my short film idea be called?
    here's this i have an idea for a short film about seven women who attempt to break the world record for
    the biggest bubblegum bubble! (under the supervision of 2 british people from the guinness book of
    world records!)

    what should the idea be called?

    • ANSWER:
      The Guinness Bubble

  11. QUESTION:
    How do people shoot movies at all different angles?
    I'm interested in shooting a short film but I'm a complete rookie, and have no prior experience to flimmaking. What I would like to know is how people are able to shoot a scene from far focusing on the actor away one second, and the next second they're looking at their shoulder's point of view. Do they have multiple cameras? Do they need to record the scene for a few seconds, stop the action and move to the next point of view and then continue recording or what? What's an easy way to move between different point of views on a scene?

    • ANSWER:
      Films are rarely (if ever) shot as you finally see them or even in the order that you finally see them, there may be minutes, days, weeks or even months between shots that occur one after the other in the movie. You can play with time in a video. A clip that occurs at the beginning of the movie may well have been shot on the last day of shooting or may have be found necessary to progress the plot during editing.

      It's very important that the white balance is the same on every shot, indoors or out otherwise it will be easy to see cuts, lighting is the single most important aspect of film making, it needs to be consistent, to this end film makers rarely rely on the lighting present when they arrive on set, lighting has to be repeatable, I have spent days arranging lighting for the shots that will be required, I have lit a whole street in one of my movies, it took weeks to get right before the camera was even on set. Meticulous records need to be kept as you (as the Director) may decide you need another shot weeks later.

      I have never used multiple cameras, can't afford them for one thing, though I do have more than one, but the main reason is it's difficult getting your ideas over to one cameraman, virtually impossible with two. It quickly becomes like juggling soot. I've found using two cameras takes longer than using one, but that is my preference.

      Friends of mine who shoot action movies may well shoot a scene that is expensive to stage, explosions and the like with multiple cameras from multiple positions as they know they will only get one chance, they borrow all the cameras they can get hold of (mine included). but for most video's one camera is fine, and preferred.

      One of the best books I have ever read about directing is, surprisingly, Serif Movie Plus Directors Guide.

      Unlike stills photography, shooting movies is a collaborative effort with lot's of people involved. Pre-planning is essential, story boards, lighting (important) you literally take the movie in your head shot by shot, then expect it to change on the days(s) you spend shooting the footage. Then you edit the movie, which is when you find you need a re-shoot or another scene, video is a large investment in time and effort.

      The one thing that marks a video as amateur is sound quality, microphone position is every bit as important and camera position. You will need and accumulate lots of gear.

      Chris

  12. QUESTION:
    How do I say these sentences in German?
    1. I just got back from visiting the dentist's office.
    2. Today I accomplished a lot of things.
    3. I thought hard about ideas for my short film I'm filming next Wednesday.
    4. I read a chapter in my book for my English class
    5. I washed all my clothes and even my bedsheets.

    Thanks people, big help.

    Also, fluent/native speakers only please. You won't get any points for using an online translator.

    • ANSWER:
      1 Ich komme gerade vom Zahnarzt. / Ich bin gerade von der Zahnarztpraxis zurückgekommen.
      2 Heute habe ich viele Dinge geschafft.
      3 Ich habe scharf über Ideen für meinen Kurzfilm nachgedacht, welchen ich nächsten Mittwoch drehen werde.
      4 Ich habe für meinen Englischkurs ein Kapitel in meinem Buch gelesen.
      5 Ich habe all meine Kleider und sogar die Bettlaken gewaschen.

  13. QUESTION:
    Surrealist Films Ideas On Alice In Wonderland Help?
    I am making a short surrealist film based on Alice In Wonderland.

    I was wondering if you guys had any ideas?
    I want it to be really weird, and maybe even gross.
    I like my art to have a meaning and make you want to be sick by being shocking.
    I am struggling to get ideas, was wondering do you have any?

    Anything is welcome, even if it doesnt relate to the book at all.

    • ANSWER:
      no idea, sorry

  14. QUESTION:
    Easy and affordable way to make stop motion characters?
    I already have a camera, lights, etc.

    I'd like to make some stop motion characters and props, but would like to avoid the "clay" look if at all possible. My budget is extremely limited.

    Any ideas? I don't mind having to create things myself.

    In a perfect world, I'm looking for a similar look to Tim Burton's short film "Vincent" (it's on youtube). Not necessarily Tim Burton's style, but that type of...puppets, I guess you'd call them?

    Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      A limited budget by no means your film and your puppets have to look bad, it just means you need to be a little more creative in making your stop motion puppets. You can cobble together puppets out of anything. Wood, cloth, paper, cardboard, popsicle sticks, recyclables, etc. Anything that can be moved in front of a camera can be used to do stop motion. Plastecine, old clothes, books, toys, anything. Maybe these examples will get your imagination going.

      There's a guy who goes by the name of PES who uses ordinary household objects to do animation:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFmnGULalLs
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM5_GVtIrs4

      You could use paper cutouts to do animation:

      You can even use fruit:

      Sesame street used to do this animated short with characters on glasses:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8j565lLv...

      Pretty much anything you can move in front of a camera can be used for stop motion. Even yourself!

      http://www.generallyawesome2.com/videos/cardboard-box-race.html.html

  15. QUESTION:
    What are some books I can adapt into a short film?
    I have to adapt a book for my school's theatre class, but I have no ideas. Does anyone have some suggestions for a book to adapt that is appropriate for a high school audience?

    • ANSWER:
      A Raisin in the sun
      Rent
      Romeo and Juliet anything by Shakespeare
      Diary of Anne Frank

  16. QUESTION:
    what are some books i can adapt into a short film?
    I have to adapt a book for my school's theatre class, but I have no ideas. Does anyone have some suggestions for a book to adapt that is appropriate for a high school audience?

    • ANSWER:
      Guess you should take up reading instead of wasting your time on the internet. Why do you expect someone will do your work for you?
      "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has it's limits" Albert Einstein

  17. QUESTION:
    How do I write a freaking synopsis for a 5-minute short film?
    Any ideas? What kind of story should I tell within 5 minutes? How to write it in a synopsis? Wouldn't that be too short? Thanks for helping !

    • ANSWER:
      I'm lost. I have no idea if you need to make a 5-minute film that gives a synopsis of a book, which makes more sense since this is a question and answer forum about books and authors. Do you need to write a 5-minute synopsis of a 5-minute film? Do you need to pretend you saw a 5-minute film and write a synopsis on that? It seems the homework assignment annoyed you enough that the question is too short to understand. (Or, I just came up for air from doing my math homework and landed on this question.)

      But synopsis! Not that hard. Just tell what happens in whatever you have to talk about. You don't even have to give your opinion or thought into it. And 5-minute film? I don't know if it's one film in particular or anything you want, but YouTube has enough short films that something on there should interest you. Be real now. Which would you rather do--third year Algebra homework or write the storyline for something you watched? At least yours requires little thinking. I don't want to figure out the answer for X or Y anymore for the rest of my life.

      Be happy though. Winter break is coming. Woohoo!

  18. QUESTION:
    How could I start a career as a film director?
    I am 15 and have made a couple action war drama films. But I want to get famous and become a great movie director. Give me a great answer and you might get 10 points.

    • ANSWER:
      Excerpted from the book, "What I Really Want to Do: On Set in Hollywood"

      You may actually get your first directing opportunity via a direct relationship you have with an established Producer, Studio Executive, or Actor. Building those connections means living and working in places where those people are.

      To that end, while you are writing and/or “selling” yourself with previous projects you’ve created (e.g., short films, screenplays), you should be willing to go to work in the industry no matter how menial your jobs might be. Working as a PA in the production office or as a member of the technical crew will give you some access to those with power who can help you become a Director. Nearly as important, working within the industry gives you opportunities to really learn the nut-and-bolts process that gets a movie made. This experience will be invaluable if you ever get the chance to make a living as a Director. You’ve got your dream to pursue, but you also have to keep yourself clothed, fed, and sheltered in the meantime. The trick here is that while you are working in the industry as something other than a Director, you have to enjoy the journey toward your goal because that dream is elusive and may never be realized.

      You have to prove to someone with money and/or power that you have the talent and skill required to guide a cast and crew in the creation of an entertaining and profitable product. Any previous experience you have, screenplays you’ve written, projects you’ve directed, and relationships you’ve developed all contribute toward getting you jobs that put money into your bank account.

      There is no single way to do this and no guarantee that any of those elements will put you in the Director’s chair. A certain amount of luck is involved, in that you must meet the right people at the right time. However, you can improve your chances by being prepared for these opportunities when they arrive. Don’t just have an idea for a film. Take all the spare moments you have to sit down and write the screenplay so that when you meet a person who is interested in you and the idea, you’ll have something tangible to give him. Instead of buying luxuries like big-screen TVs or a nice car, invest that money into producing a short film to highlight your skills.

      And you’re not just leaving it up to chance that you’re going to meet the right people at the right time. When you have something real to present, like a screenplay or a short film, actively seek out those who can propel your career forward. Try to get your material seen by an agent by asking for referrals from others who are already represented. Submit your screenplays to writing contests. Enter your short films into festivals. You have to be enthusiastic and persistent, yet not to the point of annoyance. Your work might be great, but if people don’t like you, there will always be that pleasant someone else around the corner with an idea that is just as good.

      There is a LOT more to know for anyone who is serious about creating an actual career in the professional film industry. Look for the book for everything you need to know.

      Good luck!

      Brian Dzyak
      Cameraman/Author
      IATSE Local 600, SOC
      http://www.whatireallywanttodo.com

  19. QUESTION:
    How do you make money writing?
    I woul like to write something whether it's short stories, short films or comics I have plenty of ideas but I don't know how I get them out there.

    • ANSWER:
      This is actually two questions, but I will answer them both.

      First, the way to make money writing is to write something that everybody wants. You have to examine the writing world and find out where there is a need. Do your research and find out where the most money is made. Also, be prepared to do be versatile. You can't just write one thing and expect the money to roll in. In the whole USA, there are probably only about 500 people who make their living by writing. Every good writer has to have a day job. Dean Koontz, for example, spent much of his early writing career as a high school teacher. Science Fiction writer Hal Clement was a high school science teacher.

      Second, you must be prepared to do many things, but make sure they are profitable things. Blogging is no good; everybody blogs, and you can't make any money at that. Comics are starting to die out because most of the readers are finding what they need online. Films are a possibility, but screenwriting takes practice, and you have to understand how to break into that. UCLA offers classes in screenwriting, and you might be able to take them online. Check out their website and find out!

      As for getting the stuff out there, pick up the book "Writers Market", which will give you tips and ideas about how to market your material.

      Good luck.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is a really good scientific fiction type of book?
    Im talking about like extraterrestrial life, awesome technology, and voyage to space and stuff like that. I recently just watched the movie "Contact" which was a book written by Carl Sagan. That type of stuff truly astounded me and I want to read a book that's similar to that stuff. Anyone have ant recommendations?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends what you like. Isaac Asimov - the guy who wrote the book they scrambled to make I Robot - once claimed that you could write any genre as science fiction - detective sf, romance sf, historical sf, even cowboy sf - then set out to prove it by writing them himself! Some of his stuff is really good - kudos for tackling themes for the first time - but some has dated badly.
      Another classic writer is John Wyndham - The Day of the Triffids, Midwich Cuckoos, The Chrysalids etc. He also wrote a lot of interesting short stories.
      (One of the best aspects of SF is the mass of short stories available - a result of magazine publishing in the early days. Short stories and novellas are also good for exploring ideas - and from the reader's point of view good for keeping you reading through your teens or during those times of your life when you don't fancy committing to a novel!)
      I really enjoyed Vonda Macintyre's emotional rollercoaster The Exile Waiting which is about a teen genius trying to escape a post-apocalyptic Earth. And I'm not ashamed to admit I cried over Maria Doria Russell's The Sparrow.
      Not all SF has to be dark - try James White's Hospital Station stories or Colin Capp's Unorthodox Engineers. And, as already mentioned, the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy is superb - although I preferred the original radio series to either the later books and tv versions or the film.
      However, my all-time favourite sf writer is Ursula Leguin who writes about struggles for liberty and equality. Try The Left Hand of Darkness or The Dispossessed.
      Good luck - and enjoy.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to realistically contract a modern killer for a book plot without sounding too contrived?
    Looking for some realistic and modern ideas for contracting a killer for a book plot. I am currently working with using Craigslist and similar internet resources but don't read that genre. The ways I am familiar with from older books sound too Dick Tracey.

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the persons who wants to contact a killer!
      Try to find a copy of Michel Deville's film Péril en la demeure (Death in a French Garden), the protagonist actually does not hire the killer but there's an unusual way to get in contact with one.
      Also try Kaurismäki's I Hired a Contract Killer, Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, and Becker's L'éte meurtrier (One Deadly Summer) - different, but a way to find someone who kills people for you.
      These films might give you an idea of how far you can go. In a world where people can hire human beings to kill other human beings - what is realism?
      I think it's mainly about the place where you meet a killer - it usually is dark side roads, a seedy men's restroom, an obscure park, or 'speakeasies'. I would like to see/read it happening in the full light of day, in an environment that does not fit - a sunny beach where children play in the sand (the protagonists would both sweat, etc.), a charity ball - wherever - but no more dark side roads.
      I also would like to see something going wrong - usually the talking is short and the killer vanishes misteriously - bore me!
      I would like to see a killer (unlike the always nervous drug dealers) who isn't hard-boiled and a 'client' who is nervous. It would be interesting to find an INTERESTING way to show it the other way around. Or to show that the killer's conscience-proofness is mere surface - whatever.
      Another thing is the way the protagonist gets in contact with a contract killer - modern? On the internet? Yahoo Answers - Can anyone tell me how to find a contract killer? 😕 ! My space? The 'Rohtenburg cannibal' found his victims via internet chats - it's all been done before. Maybe he's watching a murder and follows the
      offender - I think this has been done before, too. He may find a cell phone and find stored phone numbers one of which leads him to a contract killer? 😕 ! I surrender .... Modern technology does not seem to be a way to show a modern way to get in contact with a killer....

  22. QUESTION:
    How would a person with no film experience go about directing low-budget/indie films?
    Right now I am a pharnacy tech working on my last year of schooling. I have always had thing for film but never pursued it because I didn't feel it was a stable career for a family. But I think it something I could do for fun on the side. My finacee used to do a little acting but she never really did anything big. How would I go about making low budget films?

    • ANSWER:
      First thing you do is get likewise minds. People that want to make movies as well and that you are absolutely sure will do the work and go that extra mile. Have people around you that you can trust.

      Then start brainstorming ideas (with your group). Buy couple of beers and have a lot of paper, pens and post-it's handy. Just be creative and don't think about limitations just yet.

      Learn about screen writing. I recommend reading and learning from these books:
      http://www.amazon.com/Save-Last-Book-Screenwriting-Youll/dp/1932907009
      and
      http://www.amazon.com/Screenwriters-Workbook-Revised-Syd-Field/dp/0385339046/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1281471047&sr=1-1

      Once you have your ideas, story and characters figured out you write the screenplay. Once that is finished you rewrite, rewrite and rewrite till it's absolutely perfect. If it's at all possible, you can go scout for locations during or after the screen-write phase.

      During the same phase you might want to look in to equipment. I recommend you owning your own camera. If you have the money for it, by all means buy the Panasonic HVX 200.
      http://reviews.cnet.com/digital-camcorders/panasonic-ag-hvx200/4505-6500_7-31520842.html
      Learn your camera inside out. Other things you need: Sound equipment (boom mic) and lamps (redheads, soft boxes). Again you can rent it. You just have to search for it.

      Casting: Very important. Again, make sure you hire people you can trust. If you can't pay them, promise them a free copy of the finished product or offer to help them with a movie. Or simply pay them some gas money if that's needed. Have some food and drinks present at your casting. Film your candidates. You can find all kinds of thing on the net and in books about casting.

      If your actors and locations are locked make a filming schedule. Make sure to do it when everyone's available (crew and cast). The weekend's are usually a good time.

      Before you roll one camera make sure you have script meeting with your cast. Read the script with your actors and usually, they'll have some input too. Don't let them change the script too much but sometimes they'll have a good idea on how to deepen their character.

      Be patient with your actor's and crew. Keep it light and have fun. Be sure though that the actors can go to ONE person and one person only. That's the director. If everyone starts shouting directions etc. It's going to be a mess. Make sure everyone knows their role and agree to it. Ego's might be a problem sometimes. So, be strict and decisive but NEVER EVER be a bully or a douche.

      I could go on and on but the best way to find out is to just do it! Hope to see a movie of yours. Start with short movies first. Learn and hone your craft. When you are confident enough about your skills you can go and make a feature length if you want.

      GOOD LUCK!

  23. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know any good literary tragedies to study?
    I have to complete a research assignment in English on literary tragedy. I'm looking for some interesting non-Shakespearian tragedies, preferably modern. I'm able to use songs, poems, books plays, short stories and films. Does anyone have any ideas? Thanks a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      Death of A Salesman (Arthur Miller) is always a good one.
      Germinal (Zola)
      Not I (Samuel Beckett)

  24. QUESTION:
    does anyone know any australian visual or written texts that use landscape to explore ideas?
    im doing an assignment for english where i need to analyse a written and visual text that use landscapes (any kind) to explore ideas. this can be poetry, art, film, short story, novel anything! i have looked for hours but can find any good ones! they must be composed by an australian. help!

    • ANSWER:
      A complicated, multi-faceted relationship to Australia is displayed in much Australian writing, often through writing about landscape. Barbara Baynton's short stories from the late 1800s/early 1900s convey people living in the bush, a landscape that is alive but also threatening and alienating. Kenneth Cook's Wake in Fright (1961) portrayed the outback as a nightmare with a blazing sun, from which there is no escape. Colin Thiele's novels reflected the life and times of rural and regional Australians in the 20th century, showing aspects of Australian life unknown to many city dwellers.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_literature
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Baynton
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_Cook
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Thiele

      ----------------------------------------------------------

      You might also want to check up and google on the Australian poet John Kinsella

      He apparently writes landscape poetry....
      http://www.cstone.net/~poems/essahenr.htm

      You might also want to get his book "The New Arcadia"
      http://www.johnkinsella.org/

      Here are some of his poems:
      http://www.johnkinsella.org/poems/silo.html
      http://www.johnkinsella.org/poems/paddock.html
      http://www.johnkinsella.org/poems/plumburst.html

      ....And here is one of his essays....
      http://www.johnkinsella.org/essays/landscapepoetry.html

  25. QUESTION:
    What are some good bucket list ideas for the summer?
    I'm 13, going into 8th grade and so far all of my past summers have been boring. I want this one to be fun. Of course I can't do anything too crazy, but I do want fun and exciting things to do. I'm not rich so ideas that cost a lot of money are out of the question. Random things to do to STRANGERS I really want to do so ideas that have to do with that are my top needs. Any ideas would be great, just leave them below. :) Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      1. Go for a walk/run/jog in the woods/park.
      2. Get some chalk. Play hopscotch and draw.
      3. Read a good book in a hammock.
      4. Go on a nature hike.
      5. Play some tennis/basketball/badminton.
      6. Go to a farmers’ market. Buy at least one weird thing you’ve never eaten before.
      7. Have a water balloon toss or fight. Whichever you prefer.
      8. Go to a yoga class.
      9. Go on a bike ride.
      10. Make a nature photo collage.
      11. See how many laps you can swim in a row. Keep practicing. Then see how many you can do by the end of the summer.
      12. Look at stars one night.
      13. Play Bingo with the old folks (never admit it when you won, or give winnings to the person sitting beside you. It’s not nice to take from the old people)
      14. Write a novel/short story. Base it on true events or just completely make it up. You can even write about things that you wish would happen in your life.
      15. Convince a random person that you’re their long-lost third cousin.
      16. Write messages on note cards. Stick the note cards in balloons and blow them up. Hang the balloons on friends/neighbors porches. When they pop the balloon they read the secret message
      17 Pick wild flowers and then play ding-dong-ditch, leaving the bouquets on people’s doorsteps. It will brighten their day (or leave ones with bugs in them on people’s doorsteps that you don’t like.
      18. Take dog for walk and runs.
      19. Have a Nerf gunfight.
      20. Have a picnic.
      21. Have an overnight movie marathon.
      22. Buy and use and develop an underwater camera.
      23. Sketch a flower.
      24. Bury a friend in the sand.
      25. Go fishing.
      26. Sleep in your backyard.
      27. Create a photo journal.
      28. Write a play.
      29. Make green eggs and ham.
      30. Sketch your pet.
      31. Have a high tea, only use iced-teas.
      32. Watch the sunrise.
      33. Watch the sunset.
      34. Make a collage out of old magazines.
      35. Swing.
      36. Skip stones at a lake.
      37. Give your dog/pet a bath outside.
      38. Leave notes in library books for the next person to find.
      39. Run through a sprinkler.
      40. Sleep until noon – once.
      41. Tie-dye your bed sheets.
      42. See some fireworks.
      43. See a professional baseball game. Cough cough Cubs.
      44. Play mini-golf.
      45.Get together with some friends and make a movie. Don’t forget to write a script, make costumes and pick the best location.
      46. Leave initials (and possibly hand print) in wet concrete.
      47. Go to the zoo.
      48. Spend an entire day in a grocery store
      49. Play Tag In The Rain.
      50. Get Bikes.
      51. Bike five miles.
      52. Go to the YMCA.
      53. Write a complaint/satisfaction letter, just to get free stuff.
      54. Go to Quincy.
      55. Fill up a whole coloring book.
      56. Destroy a watermelon.
      57. Hang out with friends.
      58. Learn a new hobby.
      59. READ books.
      60. Go to the library.
      61. Stand in 2 different states at once.
      62. Go to build-a-bear.
      63. Stay outside for 12 hours straight.
      64. Legitimate photo shoot.
      65. Celebrate a foreign holiday the way the natives do.
      66. Get a tan tattoo.
      67. Convince someone you’re from a foreign country.
      68. Wake up every morning before 9:00 a.m.
      69. Water fight. Including but not limited to: balloons, guns, hoses, and buckets.
      70. Superglue a quarter to the ground.
      71. Bake Dog Treats.
      72. Go 24 hours without food.
      73. Write a note on a stranger’s windshield with dry-erase marker.
      74. enter a photo contest.
      75. Buy a goldfish.
      76. Answer phones like buddy the elf.
      77. Bake a batch of really cute cupcakes.
      78. Go a whole week without technology.
      79. Watch a meteor shower (Aug. 13).
      80. Write a letter to the editor.
      81. Pick an official summer song.
      82. Go To An Outdoor Concert.
      83. Mow the Lawn.
      84. Plant something edible.
      85. Spend one whole day barefoot.
      86. Help an old lady cross the street.
      87. Create something made out of duct tape.
      88. Play tennis in the rain.
      89. Sleep in a car for a night.
      90. Go To A Fair.
      91. Watch a foreign film.
      92. Have everyone you meet for a day sign your shirt.
      93. Jump into a pool fully clothed.
      94. Carve your name into a tree.
      95. Stretch every day
      96. Go to an “Open Late” restaurant past midnight
      97. Continue into my journey of photography. Yes, this means experiment on Molly and nature, anything and everything.
      98. Buy Ice Cream From The Ice Cream Truck.
      99. Go to a midnight movie premiere
      100. Go a whole week without technology.
      101. Go 48 hours without shoes on.
      102. Face Paint.
      103. Go to an aquarium
      104. Eat Kabobs.
      105. Learn 10 new words. And actually use them.
      106. Go movie hopping.
      107. Cover a car in sticky notes.
      108. Build and start a campfire.
      109. Go Flower-Picking.
      110. Have a Disney movie marathon.
      111. No facebook for two weeks.
      112. Have A Spa Day.
      113. Make a time capsule to open after college graduation.
      114. Finger paint a picture and then frame it.
      115. Say ‘yes’ to everything for one day.
      116. Carve a watermelon.
      There are more on the website down below
      Happy summer
      Alicia

  26. QUESTION:
    Can I use public domain short stories as scripts for short films?
    As an assignment for a video class, we have to adapt a short story into a screenplay. I want to take it to the next level: shoot it and maybe submit it (it depends on how good it is... one thing at a time). If I want to do this, can I use a public domain short story or play? And if so, is there a place where I can see if a story is PD?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you can use public domain short stories as a film script. Actually, a great idea. Go to Gutenberg.org for hundreds -- if not thousands -- of pd books, many containing short stories. Good luck -- wish I could see your film!

  27. QUESTION:
    I have a great idea for a book how do I find someone to help with financing the project?
    It will be somewhat of a coffee table book w/ lots of pics and short stories.Religiously based theme book.How do i get funds for expenses such as film and travel.

    • ANSWER:
      If you're a first time author, you will need to come up with a summary of the book as well as about the first 50 or so pages of the book. That would include sample photographs.

      For general information on agents and publishers and how to put a book proposal together, you should get a copy of "2008 Writer's Market" by Robert Brewer. It should answer most of your questions.

  28. QUESTION:
    Is 16mm a good choice to shoot a low budget horror film on?
    I'm working on my first feature length film, and i'm not sure whether to go film or video. I definitely can't afford 35mm, so obviously, I thought 16mm might be somewhat cheaper. It seems like alot of the high-end camcorders now shoot at 24fps which might allow me to get that "film look" that many independent filmmakers try to achieve. Just need some advice from a few experienced people out there who have 'been there, done that". Oh yeah, what would be the cost of Kodak or Fugi film for a 90 minute horror flick? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Johnny, and welcome to Yahoo!Answers:

      I already gave fellow Contributor L's comments a "thumbs up", but I figured I'd go ahead and discourage you from even trying 16mm film, since 1) you can't spell "Fuji" and have no idea what film stock costs, much less the processing dollars after you shoot it, and 2) you probably have no idea that the "sound" won't get captured by the film camera, or how to edit them together later.

      As far as dollar-cost, just the raw Fujifilm 16mm stock (no processing) costs around - per minute. Processed and transferred to DV (telecine or film-scanner to video for editing) it ends up being around - per minute.

      And if you never heard of "shooting ratio" before you had read #4 of L's post (the "3x...5x-6x" part), your pocket-book will give you a quick education in going broke! A 90-minute finished film means you will have shot way more than the 00 or more that just 90-minutes of raw film costs. Think more like 00-000 (for between 3:1 and 10:1 shooting ratios) for blank film, and 00-,000 by the time you get everything back from the lab. L's estimate of 5:1 or 6:1 for a beginner is pretty conservative, which is why I mention 10:1.

      And that doesn't count your camera rental, sound recording, remix, music costs, or color correction/matching.

      If you've never shot a film of any kind before, do what George Lucas & Tim Burton did with their original versions of "THX 1138" and "Frankenweenie", respectively: make a short film first (15-30 minutes). [Lucas had USC Film School & a Navy film-training class to fund his efforts; Burton got fired after spending ,000,000 of Disney's money on his.]

      Otherwise, shoot on video and keep your "low budget" film actually low-budget.

      hope this helps,
      --Dennis C.
       

  29. QUESTION:
    How does one get into film school after completing an undergrad degree?
    I have an undergraduate degree in biology, but I want to go into film rather than med school.

    How plausible is it to try to get into a graduate film school in this situation? How difficult or easy is it to get into film school in general? And would film school be a good idea for someone with little to no movie-making experience?

    I'm looking to be a screenwriter or producer (but I'm not aiming as high as director just yet). I would also be interested in being a medical/technical advisor for a TV show or movie. Any advice would help.

    • ANSWER:
      do a short course - eg two months, in screenwriting or general film production techniques. Get some books on screenwriting and go to Drew's script-o-rama and download some good scritps and analyse them. a good book is Ray Frensham' s 'teach yourself scriptwriting'

  30. QUESTION:
    What's a simple disney movie I can make a mini-movie out of?
    I want to do any disney tale that is simple that won't need many complicated props. Any ideas? I'm making a short film after a disney movie. (or book)

    • ANSWER:
      high school musical 1,2 or 3
      snow white?

  31. QUESTION:
    Teens - what texts do you enjoy in English lessons? What are your favourite books to read?
    What makes an interesting English lesson? What kind of texts & books do you like to study? How can your teacher make your English lesson more interesting?
    Why isn't English a great lesson for you?

    • ANSWER:
      I loved english in high school and did uni grade english for my last 3 years there. But what constitutes a fun lesson and interesting text really falls down to the age of the students you're teaching and their learning copasity.

      For example younger students would more likely enjoy reading fun, exciting books and doing creative activities. For example, reading a book and then writing their own short story in the same genre and point of view. Or reading a discriptive passage from a book (either about a place or character) then drawing what they think the person or place would look like given the discription writen.

      For older students however you'd possibly want to move up to deeper more challenging books. All quiet on the western front, the girl in the picture, children of the dust, yellow wall paper, Shakespeare plays, Mao's last dancer, lord of the flies and one flew over the cuckoo's nest. Now for an example of some interesting activities.
      Lets say the students have been reading the book 'All quiet on the western front' (by Erich Maria Remarque). If you've read the book you'll know that its set during the war from the point of view of a German soldier named Paul Baumer. You could then have the students watch the film based on the book (I suggest the newer version staring Richard Thomas and Ernest Borgnine as it's abit more interesting than the older black and white version of the film). Watching the film will help them visualise what the books talking about and will be a nice relaxing lesson. As for a proper assignment style activity, have them pick a character that died within the book (in this case most, if not all the main characters die so there's a few to choose from) and have them write a eulogy for the character from the point of view of a friend or family member. Have them reflect on the characters personality, come up with some realistic memories of their childhood etc. (I had to do this in 11th grade but I wrote it on german and english so it does give students away of being creative.) Students with a talent for music could even add a bit of a song to the end or if someone is good at poetry they could add a poem in. Have them preform the assignment as an oral pressentation.
      Another idea is to have the students pick a book and write an epiloge or prologe for it.

      If you want anymore ideas or anything, feel free to email me.

  32. QUESTION:
    Im looking to be an actress. Can anyone give me some tips on how i can start & make it my career?
    Or know any acting coaches or film directors you can refer me to?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are serious about wanting to act, you should start by reading every play you can get hold of, reading books, and going to a theatre club or stage group and learning everything you can. You don't need a coach - you need to learn in a small group.

      You don't just approach film directors - you'll need to apply for auditions via an agent one day - but not until you've had several years of first-class training and lots of relevant experience on stage and in short films.

      Nothing you are taught at school is a waste of time – you never know what is going to be really useful for you as an actor, and even stuff like history, geography, science, cooking, maths, etc, will probably come in handy when you least expect it. Actors need to be very intelligent, able to understand loads of subjects, well-read, for example able to read Shakespeare and so on. It’s no good reading a script if you can’t understand what your character and the others are talking about!

      Work hard at all your school subjects and get as many good grades as you can so you can get onto a college course in Drama or Performing Arts, with extras like Psychology, English, Sociology, etc.
      After high school you’ll be able to apply to get into a drama school, although these are all very hard to get into. You will need to be able to work on stage as well as to camera. Singing is often required, so join a choir or try to afford lessons somehow. Dance is also useful. It’s a good idea to have some other skill which you can use to earn money in between acting jobs – you’ll need it! Typing, bar work, office work, shop work – anything you can do, really, but make sure you quite enjoy it too, as you’ll probably spend more time doing than that acting!

      You are looking at years of hard work, very little glamour, terrible rates of pay – if any – doing odd jobs just to pay the bills while you’re auditioning for acting work. It’s not something you should even be considering unless you’re totally passionate about acting and can’t imagine doing anything else. You’ll probably never be famous, or make much money, but if it’s what you really want, go for it. If it’s just a nice idea because it sounds fun and exciting and so on, forget it.

  33. QUESTION:
    How can i get started if i want to act?
    I have always wanted to act but never done anything about it. I was wondering if you guys have any sugestions on how I can get started? I have no prior acting experience, however I feel that I am pretty good at it and most of the people I know seem to think that I would be good on T.V due to my sense of humor. How can I go about finding good casting calls for movies, commercials, short films, shows etc. coming up?

    • ANSWER:
      If I was you I would look around your local area for an amateur drama group, and give that a try first of all to make sure you do really like it. If you find that you do, then you would want to look for an agent to represent you if you want to do anything professional. Look around and see what each agent offers. Some may only do TV and Film, some might get lots of theatre castings, but not many commercials, so look around and see what you like the look of. When you've chosen which agency you'd like to be represented by, contact them to find out what you have to do to apply. You'll probably have to send in a CV and cover letter. You say you've had no acting experience, but did you maybe do any school plays? Put even little things like that on your CV. Also put any other skills you have. Do you sing? Do you play a musical instrument? Had any dance lessons? Also include a recent photograph of yourself. At this stage it probably won't have to be professional, but if you get accepted then the agency might want you to have a professional photo shoot. When you're happy with your CV, write a cover letter briefly explaining that you'd join the agency. If they like the look of your CV, they will probably ask to see you in person. I'd be wary of an agency that just accepts you based on your CV. After they've auditioned you, they will let you know whether they want to have you on their books, and if they do, then they will tell you what to do next. Never give an agent money upfront, they will take a percentage of your wage from any job they get you, but you shouldn't have to pay them to be on their books. You might however have to pay for professional photos and things like entry into Spotlight.
      If they decided not to accept you, ask why. It's always good to get feedback, so you can look at where to improve. A good idea is to apply to more than 1 agency, as then you have more of a chance of getting accepted by 1, and if you're accepted by all of them, you have more of a choice as to where you go! Another good way of looking for auditions is to look on the internet. You can look for websites that casting directors post auditions onto, or ones with a lot of students making short films, and apply for some of those.

      Right I think I've finished now! That must have been the longest answer ever!! So, I hope that helped at least a bit, and good luck!!

  34. QUESTION:
    What are some things I could have my boyfriend do for me over skype?
    Ok so I and my boyfriend have hit a bit of a creative snag. We are currently living pretty far apart, but we Skype a lot. Any new or interesting ideas for us? Oh yah and he likes me to be in charge of what we do, so if ya got anything along those lines it would be helpful.

    • ANSWER:
      You could play games--word games like 20 questions, or hangman or things like that, especially if you have video cameras. You could read to each other (me and my GF used to do that. We'd pick a book and take turns reading to each other half an hour before going to sleep. After a while, though, we had to stop because my voice made her always go to sleep. Now when she has trouble sleeping she asks me to read to her. And it doesn't matter what I read, it just puts her right to sleep.) You could find interesting stuff on the Internet and share it. I think there's a program that allows you to surf the web together.

      If you have cellphone cameras, or just regular digital cameras, you can each take pictures of where you go and things you see during the day and then share them over the Internet. You can even do short film clips. If you have smartphone you can use DropBox, and every picture or video clip you do goes there immediately so others can see it right away.

  35. QUESTION:
    What are some advantages/positives about suffering and pain?
    So I have to write a paper for my class about the advantages or positive things about experiencing pain and suffering. The two ideas I have so far are:

    Pain protects in the way that if you didn't have the sensation of pain, you might burn your hands off in a fire before you realized it was a bad thing.

    Suffering teaches us compassion toward others who are also suffering.

    Suffering can make you stronger and more capable.

    What other ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Let me see? I succumbed to Rheumatoid Arthritis at the young age of 21, although it was not diagnosed until I was 29 and when I ended up legless, flat on my back in Hospital at 34, I guessed what they diagnosed, was right? Yes it took me that long to accept the diagnosis. I am now 50. Due to drugs, a certain amount of pain I feel means I am alive, if that makes sense? Like if they numb me completely, I would be out of my brain and wondering if I was alive. I am certaily a different person now than I was before RA. Like if I wake up in the morning, I consider it to be a bonus. If I managed to get out of bed unassisted, a double bonus. If I manage to make the cloakroom, things are looking real good. Anything after that, means I should not waste the time I have! So I think it has made me more aware of how short life really is and how we all take life for granted. I would not agree on the compassion to others? Many people will scream when they really do not have a serious health problem and when I see this, I am not compasionate, just annoyed. Likewise because I am Disabled, although still mobile, you can easily spot people who are faking their illness, just by the way they walk and talk. When I am around other people who are Disabled, be it Arthritis, MS, wheelchair user due to car accident, well we tend to treat each other as 'normal' do not see any disability. Compasion does not come into it, the opposite occurs, we tend to compare notes and take the fun out on each other. Things like, why do you feel the need to wear shoes when you cannot walk? How long does it take you to wear a pair of shoes out? Yes I am a stronger person and things that used to upset me no longer do. Once when I would be compasionate, I am no longer, because I know what it is like to live with pain. Capable? Well the older I get the more capbilities I loose? However, I find myself planning, negotiating, making lists, trying to figure out how I can achieve a chore, whereas before it was all so matter of fact, taken for granted. I have to improvise, a new learning curve. Likewise spontinaty is zero, because you have to learn to look after yourself first, take your drugs, and no alcohol! Socialising is not my idea of fun, as I really have zero in common with healthy people. Instead I prefer to read books, or watch a good film, let alone listen to a good radio play. However it also means I have learned to be a life observer, I see things that others take for granted, or miss completly. Like the turning of the season, the phases of the moon, things that healthy people take for granted and never question. So pain does make you question everything and finding the answers can be a long uphill battle.
      Hope that helps?

  36. QUESTION:
    Why would they actually plan on making the Fifty Shades of Grey book trilogy into a movie?
    Would not watch. The books are too sexual in nature; how will they turn an erotica into a movie?

    Anyway, yay or nay? I say nay.

    • ANSWER:
      I say YAY. Definitely. I would love to see a new era where women openly go to erotic films that are geared towards them, no shame or embarrassment included. I mean, this is a culture where 12-year-old boys go to see summer action flicks because Megan Fox's T&A are in it. It's just standard that you've gotta throw that in if you're marketing to even little boys. But for grown-a** women, the only thing we really get are chaste watered down cheesy flicks like Twilight and every romantic comedy ever. But we're not children. We're adults. For those of us who want adult romance, where do we get it? Oh yeah, books.

      So yes, I think it's high time that crossed over into film. What's the difference? If you can sit there and picture it all in your head, why can't you see it for real in front of you? Let's get rid of the brainwashed blushing and giggling and the idea that our sexuality should be a secret fantasy.

      Short answer: where do I buy my ticket? Also, please let them sell chocolate-covered strawberries at the concession stand.

  37. QUESTION:
    What are some good summer bucket list ideas?
    Crazy ideas, like rebellious things. I'm doing it with a few friends and we need a lot of crazy ideas to add to our lists! (We are all 15 and 16 so don't make it like little kid stuff, please!)

    • ANSWER:
      1. Go for a walk/run/jog in the woods/park.
      2. Get some chalk. Play hopscotch and draw.
      3. Read a good book in a hammock.
      4. Go on a nature hike.
      5. Play some tennis/basketball/badminton.
      6. Go to a farmers’ market. Buy at least one weird thing you’ve never eaten before.
      7. Have a water balloon toss or fight. Whichever you prefer.
      8. Go to a yoga class.
      9. Go on a bike ride.
      10. Make a nature photo collage.
      11. See how many laps you can swim in a row. Keep practicing. Then see how many you can do by the end of the summer.
      12. Look at stars one night.
      13. Play Bingo with the old folks (never admit it when you won, or give winnings to the person sitting beside you. It’s not nice to take from the old people)
      14. Write a novel/short story. Base it on true events or just completely make it up. You can even write about things that you wish would happen in your life.
      15. Convince a random person that you’re their long-lost third cousin.
      16. Write messages on note cards. Stick the note cards in balloons and blow them up. Hang the balloons on friends/neighbors porches. When they pop the balloon they read the secret message
      17 Pick wild flowers and then play ding-dong-ditch, leaving the bouquets on people’s doorsteps. It will brighten their day (or leave ones with bugs in them on people’s doorsteps that you don’t like.
      18. Take dog for walk and runs.
      19. Have a Nerf gunfight.
      20. Have a picnic.
      21. Have an overnight movie marathon.
      22. Buy and use and develop an underwater camera.
      23. Sketch a flower.
      24. Bury a friend in the sand.
      25. Go fishing.
      26. Sleep in your backyard.
      27. Create a photo journal.
      28. Write a play.
      29. Make green eggs and ham.
      30. Sketch your pet.
      31. Have a high tea, only use iced-teas.
      32. Watch the sunrise.
      33. Watch the sunset.
      34. Make a collage out of old magazines.
      35. Swing.
      36. Skip stones at a lake.
      37. Give your dog/pet a bath outside.
      38. Leave notes in library books for the next person to find.
      39. Run through a sprinkler.
      40. Sleep until noon – once.
      41. Tie-dye your bed sheets.
      42. See some fireworks.
      43. See a professional baseball game. Cough cough Cubs.
      44. Play mini-golf.
      45.Get together with some friends and make a movie. Don’t forget to write a script, make costumes and pick the best location.
      46. Leave initials (and possibly hand print) in wet concrete.
      47. Go to the zoo.
      48. Spend an entire day in a grocery store
      49. Play Tag In The Rain.
      50. Get Bikes.
      51. Bike five miles.
      52. Go to the YMCA.
      53. Write a complaint/satisfaction letter, just to get free stuff.
      54. Go to Quincy.
      55. Fill up a whole coloring book.
      56. Destroy a watermelon.
      57. Hang out with friends.
      58. Learn a new hobby.
      59. READ books.
      60. Go to the library.
      61. Stand in 2 different states at once.
      62. Go to build-a-bear.
      63. Stay outside for 12 hours straight.
      64. Legitimate photo shoot.
      65. Celebrate a foreign holiday the way the natives do.
      66. Get a tan tattoo.
      67. Convince someone you’re from a foreign country.
      68. Wake up every morning before 9:00 a.m.
      69. Water fight. Including but not limited to: balloons, guns, hoses, and buckets.
      70. Superglue a quarter to the ground.
      71. Bake Dog Treats.
      72. Go 24 hours without food.
      73. Write a note on a stranger’s windshield with dry-erase marker.
      74. enter a photo contest.
      75. Buy a goldfish.
      76. Answer phones like buddy the elf.
      77. Bake a batch of really cute cupcakes.
      78. Go a whole week without technology.
      79. Watch a meteor shower (Aug. 13).
      80. Write a letter to the editor.
      81. Pick an official summer song.
      82. Go To An Outdoor Concert.
      83. Mow the Lawn.
      84. Plant something edible.
      85. Spend one whole day barefoot.
      86. Help an old lady cross the street.
      87. Create something made out of duct tape.
      88. Play tennis in the rain.
      89. Sleep in a car for a night.
      90. Go To A Fair.
      91. Watch a foreign film.
      92. Have everyone you meet for a day sign your shirt.
      93. Jump into a pool fully clothed.
      94. Carve your name into a tree.
      95. Stretch every day
      96. Go to an “Open Late” restaurant past midnight
      97. Continue into my journey of photography. Yes, this means experiment on Molly and nature, anything and everything.
      98. Buy Ice Cream From The Ice Cream Truck.
      99. Go to a midnight movie premiere
      100. Go a whole week without technology.
      101. Go 48 hours without shoes on.
      102. Face Paint.
      103. Go to an aquarium
      104. Eat Kabobs.
      105. Learn 10 new words. And actually use them.
      106. Go movie hopping.
      107. Cover a car in sticky notes.
      108. Build and start a campfire.
      109. Go Flower-Picking.
      110. Have a Disney movie marathon.
      111. No facebook for two weeks.
      112. Have A Spa Day.
      113. Make a time capsule to open after college graduation.
      114. Finger paint a picture and then frame it.
      115. Say ‘yes’ to everything for one day.
      116. Carve a watermelon.
      There are more on the website down below
      Happy summer
      Alicia

  38. QUESTION:
    What are some good books for someone questioning faith?
    I want both sides - books or movies or articles, websites, anything like that. I need some that say why God is real and then why He isn't. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi!

      Good for you, not too many people seem to care to research god/atheism I am glad you're open minded.

      I recommend first and foremost watching debates between bad ass atheists vs. the big believers in god on youtube. These are some of the atheists to watch: Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, and Christopher Hitchens, the first 2 are my favorites.

      Also good - Sam Harris' short and sweet book A Letter to a Christian Nation is really great.
      The God Delusion is fantastic, or you can watch a video of Dawkins giving an inclusive talk on it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcYDkZcLAug

      Bill Maher can be a bit of an asshole I admit, but his movie Religulous is really really fantastic! and a great place to get a look at a bunch of religions, religious people, their ideas and just how utterly ridiculous religion is, not to mention dangerous.. Here's a link to the movie online: 10 min short n sweet - http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=419378659422792803&ei=YrR3S6DyL6iIqQPL4MSkBw&q=religulous&hl=en#

      Or the whole movie http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=419378659422792803&ei=YrR3S6DyL6iIqQPL4MSkBw&q=religulous&hl=en#docid=-3791007322683758535

      Also a very interesting and informative film by Richard Dawkins http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=9002284641446868316&ei=N7V3S7atDKTyqAOLoZCJBw&q=richard+dawkins+root+of+all+&hl=en#

      I know I've given you a lot to look into, there is an awful lot to read and learn about religion/atheism. I find the topic spectacularly interesting and prevalent. I wish more people would take a serious look at this topic. Good luck with your search for truth. Feel free to email me if you have questions, or want more things to look into!

  39. QUESTION:
    Directing and screenwriting in film as a career?
    What course should I take if I wanted to do both directing and screenwriting? Should I have a back-up career? Should I only do a course in one, or none? What is the best way to start out? Any general information would be good for starting a career in film.

    • ANSWER:
      This really depends on where you're at right now and how hard you're willing to fight for the career that you want. If you're in college right now, why not take courses in both directing and screenwriting? Many directors also write their own films, and taking courses in both could never hurt you. Explore them both and decide what's best for you. Besides courses, try reading books and blogs on the different subjects that interest you- expand your perspective. Simply search your local library or even use google books to find useful reading sources on both screenwriting and directing. You may want to check out the book "Good in a Room" by Stephanie Palmer if you're interested in looking into what kind of work is involved in pitching, which will be come crucial as a part of this type of career. "Save the Cat" by Blake Snyder is also a fantastic read for screenwriting.

      Taking courses alone, however, will not alone guarantee you a job in the industry. The best way to get your foot in the door with this kind of career is by working in the film industry. Work as a Production Assistant on a film or television show and start making connections. Intern as a script reader at production companies to see what kind of material they're looking for. Make your own short films, then once you've made work you're proud of send out to film festivals for exposure.

      I have come across many people in the industry who tell me that they choose to work in film because they simply cannot live without it. If you feel this way, go for it. Being a director, screenwriter, or both is a tough task- it's a career that you've got to be extremely committed to. Remember that there are many other jobs besides screenwriting and directing in the film and television industry- research and check it out.

      If you feel even slightly that the consistent fight to achieve a career as a director or screenwriter isn't for you- look for something as a back-up. It's a ton of work, and if you have any doubts it's definitely a great idea to have something else to fall back on. Wishing you the best of luck!

  40. QUESTION:
    How do you answer English Literature questions?
    I've got an English Literature exam coming up and I'd like to know how to answer the question about the book that you have read in class. I pretty much know it inside and out, but I don't know how to structure my answer.
    Much Appreciated.
    Thanks Guys! You both helped alot. I''m sure that I'm gunna do well, now that I know what I'm doing.
    Also how much do you have to write for the answer ?

    • ANSWER:
      Normally you break it down into sections. Just like if your were writing a novel or book. You start with an introduction to your characters or what the gist of the story is.

      Then you edit it down into a brief outline of what the book says. So you do not have to be too long winded. As long as there's enough information about the book, this will be enough.

      Similar to what a film critic does, If you watch them speaking to presenters on the television you'll get the idea in a short summary.

      This is a skillful and exact piece of word processing but you do it orally. I wish you luck and you do a good job, as I'm sure you will.

      I have done like what your attempting and even liked it.
      Make some notes, and have them to hand, this is what even teachers do.

      This is so you don't lose your train of thought.

      givemestrength

  41. QUESTION:
    What are some really good books by Stephen King?
    I've seen a couple of his movies and now I would like to read his books. I heard Duma Key and Under the Dome were pretty good. I would like a book that grabs your attention from the moment you start reading it.

    I've already seen the movies: Misery, Pet Cemetery Cujo, The Green Mile, and Dreamcatcher. So any of these books I really wouldn't like to read.

    Have ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey,

      I've read Under the Dome, It's really good :) Definitely worth a read.

      If you're looking for pure horror i suggest:
      -IT (Captures you from the start, good plot and good action, long book though)
      -Dreamcatcher (Another good book from him)
      - Pet Semetary (I know you seen the film, but the book is way different, and more creepy. Besides movies are never as good as the book) It's one of my faverites.
      -The Stand (Brilliant book, worth a read, pretty big though)
      -Carrie (Short book, his first one, has horror and creepyness)
      -The Long Walk (Yet another good one)

      I know you didnt want the books from films, but i believe the books are better, they leave so much out of the films. I really recommend you read them.

  42. QUESTION:
    How to turn your own idea for a story into an animated movie?
    to anyone whos an expert in filming: please give me the procedures.

    • ANSWER:
      Well first off write the script, and make sure it's written in the correct format otherwise you won't be taken seriously. I recommend final draft, adobe premier or celtx. That also means you need a logline, a one page and one paragraph synopsis.

      Take your script to a production company or anything you can to get it noticed. If people are interested they might also want you to be experienced.

      If pre-production happens there is a whole heap of things you need to do... I'm not quite sure about animation in post-production but it would cost quite a lot of $$$$$ purely because you'd need a large VFX team. I recommend looking most of this stuff up on the web and in books, you'll see that it's a lot of work and you may be surprised in a good or bad way.

      What is it you want to do? Direct, produce or just be the writer? Is this a feature film or a short? There are so many procedures to name for this message.

  43. QUESTION:
    What are some good books about or involving Jack the Ripper?
    I need a topic to do a English paper on, and I was thinking about Jack the Ripper. Does anybody know any good (fiction) books with explorable themes about Jack the Ripper?

    • ANSWER:
      You could try Dracula the Un-Dead by Dacre Stoker. That touches on Jack the Ripper. The graphic novel From Hell (which became a film of the same name) would be adequate for your purposes too.

      The first influential short story, "The Lodger" by Marie Belloc Lowndes, was published in McClure's Magazine in 1911 and novelised in 1913. It features a London couple, Mr and Mrs Bunting, who suspect that their lodger, Mr Sleuth, is a mysterious killer known as "The Avenger", clearly based on the Ripper. Whether Sleuth really is "The Avenger" is left open: the focus of the story is on the Buntings' psychological terror, which may be entirely unfounded, rather than the actions of "The Avenger". In 1927, "The Lodger" was the subject of an Alfred Hitchcock-directed film: The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog, and four other adaptations were filmed in later years.

      In 1926, Leonard Matters proposed in a magazine article that the Ripper was an eminent doctor, whose son had died from syphilis caught from a prostitute. According to Matters, the doctor, given the pseudonym "Dr Stanley", committed the murders in revenge and then fled to Argentina. He expanded his ideas into a book, The Mystery of Jack the Ripper, in 1929. The book was marketed as a serious study, but it contains obvious factual errors and the documents it supposedly uses as references have never been found. It inspired other works such as the theatre play Murder Most Foul and the film Jack the Ripper. Jonathan Goodman's 1984 book Who He? is also written as if it is a factual study, but the suspect described, "Peter J Harpick", is an invention whose name is an anagram of Jack the Ripper.

      Robert Bloch's short story "Yours Truly, Jack the Ripper" (published in Weird Tales in 1943) cast the Ripper as an eternal who must make human sacrifices to extend his immortality. The science-fiction anthology Dangerous Visions (1967) featured an unrelated Ripper story by Bloch, "A Toy for Juliette", and a sequel by Harlan Ellison, "The Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World", written with Bloch's permission. Bloch's work also includes The Will to Kill (1954) and Night of the Ripper (1984).

      The many novels influenced by the Ripper include:
      A Case to Answer (1947) by Edgar Lustgarten
      The Screaming Mimi (1949) by Fredric Brown
      Terror Over London (1957) by Gardner Fox
      Ritual in the Dark (1960) by Colin Wilson
      Sagittarius (1962) by Ray Russell
      A Feast Unknown (1969) by Philip José Farmer
      A Kind of Madness (1972) by Anthony Boucher
      Nine Bucks Row (1973) by T. E. Huff
      The Michaelmas Girls (1975) by John Brooks Barry
      Jack's Little Friend (1975) by Ramsey Campbell
      By Flower and Dean Street (1976) by Patrice Chaplin,
      The Private Life of Jack the Ripper (1980) by Richard Gordon
      Anno Dracula (1992) by Kim Newman
      A Night in the Lonesome October (1993) by Roger Zelazny
      Ladykiller (1993) by Martina Cole
      Savage (1993) by Richard Laymon
      Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem (1994) by Peter Ackroyd,
      Pentecost Alley (1996) by Anne Perry

  44. QUESTION:
    What are some great movies or books about history?
    I'm looking for movies or books that tell a story about history. I don't mean movies that only tell facts or history books.
    Some examples of movies that I really liked are: The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and Fat Man and Little Boy.
    I also like interesting documentaries like Fahrenheit 9/11

    Also, suggestions of any books or films that are educational in some way would be appreciated

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      The best book I ever read also is a book of history: W. Shirer; Berlin Diaries - The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1933 - 1941.

      Shirer was an American CBS Radio correspondent reporting "live"from Berlin and all major European cities before and during the war (time for broadcasts was every day midnight due to the time shift), from a Christmas Party on a German submarine and the Winter Olympics in Garmisch Patenkirchen.
      He was invited privately on Goehring's parties and often clashed violently with the Nazi censors, often winning the fights. By his profession and the old technology of short wave radio requiring short and precise sentences the book is incredible good to read, almost funny. Shirer is very sarcastic about the Nazi leaders whom he had to follow on every step. He also joined the German side on the Polish and French campaigns and is the only quasi neutral observer ever of those events (the USA were not at war with Germany at that time).
      For the fist time a had an idea what in the teaching of history is fact and what is fiction

  45. QUESTION:
    How can I get myself motivated so I want to keep on writing?
    I've tried to write a book... I don't know how many times. But I've always failed, stopped after a few thousand words, either losing interest in writing (but that only lasts for a few weeks) or getting a new idea that I like more than the book that I am then writing.
    You see, I have a great idea for a book, and I've already written a little more than 13,000 words. But, you see, I feel myself slowly losing interest in writing it, longing for starting a new book. But still, in my heart, my dream is to publish this book. I am proud of it, and I want to get it completed on paper.
    How can I motivate myself so I will WANT to open up my computer and keep writing, instead of losing the interest in it before I even manage to open up the document that holds my story and just do something else, like check my Facebook page or e-mail.
    This is my biggest dream, but I need something to motivate me so I can accomplish it.
    Have you been in this situation? What would you do, if you were me?
    Thank you so, so much for your help! I really appreciate it!
    ~Merry Christmas~

    • ANSWER:
      I too, am an aspiring writer as well as artist and I have had that problem too, although I've personally only written short stories at this point. Anyway, as for advice to help you keep writing, I have several tips.
      1. Read stories or chapters of books written by your favorite authors and then imagine how it would feel to have them reading a story written by you.
      2. Try and think about how you would feel to actually have a novel published and receiving money for something that came from your mind.
      3. Write to please yourself, if you truly want to be a writer, write the kind of stuff that interests you and don't write with your audience in mind trying to endless please other people.
      4. Get dictionaries and thesauruses to help improve your vocabulary and strengthen your writing.
      5. Imagine your book becoming a best seller and how happy that would make you!
      6. Imagine if your book was adapted into a film and how that would make you feel!

  46. QUESTION:
    What are some good project ideas on Eleanor of Aquitaine?
    Hi! I need to do a history project on Eleanor of Aquitaine but I want to do an original thing instead of a mosaic or book or game...does anyone have any ideas??? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      make a collage cubie - a 3-D model which can be converted into a game if you wish to make many cubies. otherwise, you could make a single large cubie by gluing together large sheets of card paper & enlarging the template] & fit in all the details & graphics into it. laminate if necessary.
      this site show you how to make it :
      www.creativity-portal.com/howto/a/collage/cubies.html

      or make a short film [using props & puppets] or slide show.

      how about a comic book? give the characters some nice figures & relate the story pictorially but in comic-book format so that kids would want to read it. keep the text simple.

      hope these help
      all the best

  47. QUESTION:
    What constitutes plagiarism in fiction writing?
    I am beginning to frame up a novel in an already crowded genre. Although the main story will be quite unique, the overall setting and some of the ideas are a feature of some already published books, films and games.

    Where does plagiarism or creative theft in fiction writing begin? What can an author or creator consider to be their own, and what can be considered "body of knowledge" ?

    Although I don't intend to steal anyone else's ideas, my own concept is framed upon the reading of many other works in this genre so it is hard to not recreate some of these elements.

    • ANSWER:
      Ideas, settings, themes, concepts, etc., cannot be copyrighted, and therefore you will not run into any problems regarding those matters. Plagiarism involves directly taking someone else's work (generally word for word) and passing it off as your own.

      Two people (or hundreds, for that matter) could write about the exact same topic and their work would still be considered as "their own," because no one's work would be identical to anyone else's.

      In short, you have nothing to worry about.

      Hope this helped, good luck with your writing.

  48. QUESTION:
    How would you go about writing a novel?
    I'm 17 years old and I have been working on writing a novel. I have a lot of different ideas and my dream is to be a published author. One day I would also like to publish books of poetry and short stories and maybe even one day writ a screen play.

    What I want to know is how you go about writing a novel and how would you get it published?

    • ANSWER:
      i found this article online:

      I wrote three novels before I got a nibble from a publisher. Several people have asked me how I managed to keep myself motivated, pushing myself to finish each one without any guarantee my work would ever be published. There's no secret sauce, I'm afraid - it very much depends on your personality and how determined you are to see things through to the bitter end.

      So, what does it take to write a novel? Only five or ten percent of those who embark on the process end up with a finished draft, and while I may not be an expert I can at least share the experience from the perspective of someone who has done it before. I can't promise these tips will work for you, but they might work for the next writer to come across my web site and they certainly work for me.

      By the way, my publisher just released a free ebook of my first novel to celebrate the launch of book 4 in the series. Feel free to grab a copy while you're here!
      Skills - First things first. Wanting to write a publishable book is no different to wanting to play an instrument in a top Symphony Orchestra. You need thousands of hours of practice and familiarity with the tools of the trade. In their case, music and instruments. In ours, language and words.

      Fortunately writers don't have to pay for our education. No expensive lessons required ... all you have to do is read books. If you want to write fiction, read fiction. The more you read, the more the tricks of the trade will seep in. So, if you suspect your writing isn't up to scratch, haunt the local library.

      Practice - I once considered retelling a favourite book just to get an idea of the level of detail needed. I decided I would duplicate the characters and plot exactly, rewriting the entire book scene by scene in my own words. I never did it, but I still think it could be a very useful technique. After all, you don't have to worry about plot or characterisation ... that's already been done! (Of course, you couldn't submit the result to a publisher. This would strictly be for your own consumption.)

      Consistency - try and write something every day, no matter how little. I jot down half a dozen sentences, each of which describe a scene I think I'll have to write soon. When I review them, one of them often fires my imagination and that's what I start writing about.

      Plotting - some people plot out every twist and turn beforehand, and some people just write. Although I've always been a 'write first and think later' kind of author, I'm slowly coming to appreciate having a detailed outline to work from. One reason is because I now write to deadlines, not just when there's nothing on TV and the wind is in the right direction. Writing to a plot keeps me on track.

      Coming up with a plot is a topic big enough for an article of its own, and you'll find my take on the whole process here.

      Characters - I generally don't have 'good' and 'evil' characters in my novels, just people with opposite goals. The conflict this generates is more than enough to escalate things to a satisfactory climax and conclusion. I don't spend too much time developing bit players, unless they become more important during the writing. If someone's only going to appear in your book for one paragraph, treat them like a piece of furniture. Also, try and limit the number of characters - sometimes you can combine two moronic henchmen into one - and if your book makes it into film, the casting people will thank you for saving them money. (Hey, it worked for Sleuth.)
      Want to get on with it? See my speed writing tips. Includes progress forms for hourly and daily word counts to keep you right on track.
      As a general rule your protag should be sympathetic - someone the reader can identify with. I realise that's difficult if you're writing about a serial killer, but in those cases the 'less is best' rule applies. As in, the less we see inside this monster's head, the more we fear them. If your killer is familiar and the reader starts to identify with them you've destroyed all the tension. That's why whodunits are called whodunits and not weknowwhodunnits. (Someone asked me this, so ... protag = protagonist, the major character.)

      Scenes are the story units, and there are one or more of these per chapter. You'll find a good article on writing the perfect scene here.

      Revisions - Don't bother! Okay, what I mean is... finish writing the book. You will have plenty of time for improvements later, and it's easy to kill a book by being too critical during the writing process. You're not trying to produce finished work at this stage - remember, by the time a major publisher releases a book it's been through several drafts and has also had input from a professional editor and a proof reader. Think of your first draft as a block of raw material, from which you will chip your finished work. Throw everything into it! Don't worry about inconsistencies and dead ends, they can be trimmed out afterwards. I can't emphasise this enough: finish

  49. QUESTION:
    What books or stories would you like to see made into a short film?
    We'd love to hear your ideas!

    • ANSWER:
      Waiting for the Barbarians by John Coetzee would make an excellent film.

  50. QUESTION:
    How do you cure writer's block?
    I'm having trouble writing anything new since I finished this short film about three months ago. Is there any way I can get some help on removing this block? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Just write. It does not matter what it is. Just sit down and do it. Write about your day, write about what you had for dinner last night, write about the dude you saw walking down the street on the way home from work. Whatever. Just get yourself back in the practice of writing and being descriptive and then the ideas will come.

      There is a really wonderful book called The Artists Way by a woman named Julia Cameron that talks about writers block in a very in depth way. It's a great book.


short film ideas book