Short Film Ideas No Dialogue

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Help with short film ideas needed please?
    I've already asked a similar question but need more answers so here it goes

    I really want to make a short film about the dawn of man but having a bit of trouble getting started.

    I want to make a film about cavemen and such with little dialogue (mostly grunts and such). I know that I want to have it revolve around some sort of paranormal or mystical force or object. If anyone has any story ideas or suggestions they would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      a midsummer night's dream would be funny. like caveman style

  2. QUESTION:
    Any ideas for a short film with no dialogue?
    I need an idea for a short film for my film studies coursework. I have several requirements:

    Not much Dialogue
    Possibly a circular narrative (ending where the story started)
    And/ or possibly a western setting to coincide with my previous clint eastwood project?

    Thanks for any help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      A mute Native American in a giant hamster wheel?

  3. QUESTION:
    Idea for short film with one actor in it?
    Hey my friend has a school project in which she has to make a short film. She wants to use me in it because I have acting experience but she's really struggling to think of idea/ themes to base the film on. She would like to set it all to music so no dialogue. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Like Castaway?

  4. QUESTION:
    How do people think of good dialogue for a film?
    I've seen a lot of films, where in them, they have some of the most interesting dialogue and screenwriting I've seen. Examples would be Quentin Tarantino's films. I don't know how they do it, but I wanted to write a screenplay for a short film, and how could I think of very neat and interesting dialogue?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey,

      To be honest I really hate to put this boldly, but inspiration.
      I mean, amazing people like Tarantino probably can see the situations, and the character's in their heads and they probably with that have a good idea about what they would say. To be honest, there are times where you know exactly what to say, and for playwrights, and for screenplay writers, have to recognise this, and they have to understand the character's and the mood their in and the situation that their in, and by doing this they should have a good understanding of what they would say.
      But for the most amazing dialogue, its just a matter of INSPIRATION!
      Young Miss Sparrow

  5. QUESTION:
    Whats it the best was to begin writing a script?
    I am an actor and have wanted to write a script for a very long while to make short pieces of theater or short films. I have allot of ideas and they are always buzzing around my head but I am really struggling with actually getting them down on paper, does anyone have any tips on the best way to get it rolling? Thanks in advance :)

    • ANSWER:
      I usually just start writing dialogue but lately have discovered it's really helpful to start by outlining the idea. You can do just a simple sentence outline to get your idea down on paper. Take one of the ideas that's buzzing around. For example Giant pink poodle drinks all the water in the town reservoir.
      Okay so you have an image but not a story. Start writing down the order that things happen.
      There is a mistake in the science lab. One of the techs smuggled in her pet poodle in her purse because she couldn't bear to leave it home alone. Poodle spills somebody's jar of pickled beets all over himself. Radiation causes the poodle to grow to giant size. He escapes from the lab and wreaks havoc. List types of havoc wreaked. He meets and is befriended by (whom or what?) A bunch of things happen and the poodle winds up at the town reservoir thirsty. He drinks all the water.
      What results? Someone is saved from drowning? Criminals are prevented from escaping? The entire economy of the town is destroyed because there is no more water and everyone moves someplace else and one family moves to LA and they all become movie stars?

      At this point you might think tha the story is really about the movie star family and that the part about the giant poodle was all just back story. And in fact it probably wasn't a poodle at all but just an ordinary drought.

      Writing down an outline helps you develop your idea. You can work out your plot and get an idea of what wil work and what won't before you start doing the actual "writing." You can see the order things have to be in because of what causes what. You can see where various characters enter the plot and make adjustments if you find they should be introduced earlier or later.

      The important thing is to start. Ideas do nothing for anybody as long as they are allowed to just buzz around in your head.

  6. QUESTION:
    Making a short film about coming to the end of childhood, any ideas?
    I'm making a short coming of age film as my final piece at college. Set over one day, it centers around a teenage boy and his younger sister as he comes to terms with growing up and no longer being a child.

    Can you think of any specific ways I can symbolise these themes? (shots, events, dialogue?)

    Literally anything will be appreciated, Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    Making a short film about coming to the end of childhood, any ideas?
    I'm making a short coming of age film as my final piece at college. Set over one day, it centers around a teenage boy and his younger sister as he comes to terms with growing up and no longer being a child.

    Can you think of any specific ways I can symbolise these themes? (shots, events, dialogue?)

    Literally anything will be appreciated, Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, well im sorry if this sucks but its the only thing tht came to mind, he could be packing up his old stuff and find something that hold sentimentle value to either him or him and his sister, like a toy or some kind, from when they were younger. He could um and ar about it for a little while, and maybe a friend of his could laugh at him cause he saw it in his room. He could throw it away saying that "it was just some junk he'd had lying around' . His sister could be upset with him, and maybe something could happen to make him wonder why the hell he needs his friend approval. At the end u could have him fetch the thing from the bin, dust it off and like place it on his bed or something with a voice over saying something about how "we all grow up eventually, it's a fact of life, the things you do and the way you make that journey on the other hand is totally the work of the individual, remember growing up in inevitable, acting your age...well thats optional"
      Sorry if thats not what u had in mind, its the best i could think of. Good luck!

  8. QUESTION:
    Do I model characters first or the environment?
    I'm trying to make a 3D short film but i didn't know where to start from.
    I was wondering whether i start from characters and individual objects or the environment/ scenery.

    • ANSWER:
      Start with developing your storyline, dialogues, and character development. Then do simple storyboard sketches to get an idea of who you want the film to run, story boarding also give you an idea of where to place your camera angles in reference of the character to the environment. After you've done these things it'll be easier to start on building the 3d model.
      When you get to the modeling, I recommend working on the character first. There are free stock backgrounds you could download. And then switch back and forth if you get tired of one thing.

      What 3d program are you using?

  9. QUESTION:
    If I wrote a script with references to an already existing movie, is it an adaptation or an original piece?
    If I wrote a script with references to an already existing movie, is it an adaptation or an original piece?

    The short film is a spin-off of another movie. There are only 3 characters in it. 2 are completely original (although he has a name that is referenced in the real motion picture) and 1 is a character from that movie. However, his face is covered throughout the piece and he has very few lines.

    All the dialogue is original and some visuals are inspired by the film being spun off.

    Is this an original script or an adaptation?

    • ANSWER:
      i would say it's a spin-off. to say it were an adaptation would almost mean you were re-writing the original. and, to say it were original, would say that you came up with the whole idea on your own - which you haven't. be careful - there's lots of copyright concerns when you use someone else's premise/story/characters.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it a good idea to record/add audio after?
    I'm thinking of making a short comedy film but I don't have a professional microphone that will easily record over the heads of the actors. I only have a regular microphone that could easily record separately from the video footage. So I'm asking anyone who has experience with this type of stuff... Is it a good idea to record the video of the actors talking and then have them record their voices after? Would this still look professional?

    • ANSWER:
      Most dialogue in big-budget films is actually recorded after filming. It's called ADR. However, unless you have access to professional recording and editing equipment, it's pretty much impossible to do this and have it look natural and professional. In any case, you should record dialogue whilst shooting, even if your microphone is not professional standard, so that you have what's called a guide-track to match the re-recording to.

      I'm guessing you don't have the budget to access industry-standard ADR equipment. I would recommend you hire a professional microphone for the shoot, you can do this pretty inexpensively. If you don't have good sound, your film won't come across as professional, so it's a good investment in my opinion.

  11. QUESTION:
    Is the short film of the new "9" movie a spoiler of the entire story?
    I'm extremely excited about the movie. As much as I would hate to wait until 9-9-09 to get more of the movie than just the trailers, I would hate to watch the movie and know the basic plot and ending.

    Can someone, who has watched the short film by Shane Acker, tell me if they believe it spoils the story?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think it spoils the story. It's a lot different.

      In the original short film (made in 2005), there is no dialogue and the only beanbag guy is "9". He fights a mechanized beast. The story is actually very well-told visually, conveying all sorts of information without words.

      From what I've seen in the trailers, the movie took the basic idea of the short (beanbag guys in a post-apocalyptic world) and expanded upon it, adding all sorts of characters and mythology. The movie will probably have a lot of adventures and, I *guess*, the main character will be "9".

      The short film is just a snapshot of 9's life. Basically he outsmarts one bad guy and avenges his old mentor. Just a quick 10-minute story. I don't even know if the "9" from the short is the same character as the "9" in the feature film. They might've just copied the name and the look.

      I wasn't interested in seeing the movie. Even with Tim Burton's involvement. It looked like something that should've been a video game. But when I learned about the original short I checked it out and it was very good. Definitely worth a watch, especially for animation fans. I still don't know if I want to see the movie, but I doubt the short spoils anything. It might just give you a taste of what it's all about.

      The short is available on YouTube, if you're interested.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IQcMeNh7Hc

  12. QUESTION:
    Any good ideas for short film about will power?
    does not need dialogue. Only can be one minute long.

    • ANSWER:
      Make a Short film of Cole in INFAMOUS on PS3!

  13. QUESTION:
    Can someone help on writing a short scene or play, any fun ideas?
    All I need are the basics like an exposition and a plot.

    Let me tell me you that I'm not too good at creating storylines. If i had one in front of me already, then I could write the lines. But i just need help or some ideas for a short scene or play.
    Any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Write from your own experience. Get used to writing dialogue too.

      1. Write down a few lines of a real conversation that you overheard. Write them down exactly the way you heard them, and get a few friends to act it out, just as an exercise.

      2. Read a few good plays and think about the structure and style.

      3. Think of your piece as just a scene, just a conversation that begins, has an argument or rising action, and then when you're ready, bring it to its natural end.

      4. Don't try to make it anything like films you've seen. Make it about your life, about the lives in your own community.

  14. QUESTION:
    What should a first time screenwriter know?
    I've been writing published poetry and short stories for a while. A few days ago, good friend of mine asked me to write the script for a 15-minute silent film. I've mapped a bit of the story out, but this process is much more difficult than I had imagined.

    Any ideas? Things to keep in mind? I have a high-school theatre background, so that's helping a bit. Otherwise, my lack of experience is eating me up.

    • ANSWER:
      Screenplays are written in a very specific format. The entire document is divided into scenes, and the scenes are structured to be a slug line (the heading of the scene telling you whether the scene is inside or outside, a location identifier, and what time of day it is that the scene is taking place), description (or action) and dialogue.

      My first recommendation is to read screenplays. You can do this here:

      www.script-o-rama.com
      www.simplyscripts.com
      www.imsdb.com

      You'll also need a good book on formatting. For that, I recommend the Screenwriters Bible by David Trottier. He explains all the terms and gives examples. It's a great book. You can pick it up cheapest on Amazon.com

      You'll also need formatting software. There's the professional software packages: Movie Magic Screenwriter and Final Draft. MMS is the industry standard, and - of the two - I find that it's the easiest to use. There's also the free software. It's not a standard, but it's certainly the cheapest way to get going. The software package Celtx is probably the best out there. You can get it here:

      www.celtx.com

      A 15 minute screenplay should take 15 pages (1 page = 1 minute of screen time).

      Even with a silent film, you need to have dialogue for the dialogue cards.

  15. QUESTION:
    If you were going to do a short film that's supposed to be introducing yourself, how would you do it?
    It's for film class, and it's not allowed to have dialog. I guess I could try to do " a day in my life", but that's kind of plain. What are some ideas you have, it's just supposed to explain who you are basically. How would you go about doing this?

    • ANSWER:
      Instead of a day in YOUR life, pick an object you are known for wearing and tell the story from that perspective.

      It has to be something you carry / wear wherever you go and preferably others can see.

      Baseball cap
      Wristwatch
      Brooch
      Hair decoration

  16. QUESTION:
    Will someone take this idea and turn it into a short script?
    I want to make this short film about a married couple talking to a marriage counselor about their problems. During their conversation they would keep flashing back to their nights at home and it would show comical things that they do to each other to get on each others nerves at home. I would want it to be comedy. I can do it myself, but I'm so bad with dialogue.....anybody?

    • ANSWER:
      Dude! Wise1, get a grip! There is nothing wrong with collaboration! Professional writers do it all the time!

      I would suggest, however that you find someone near you that you can meet with in person. That way you can make sure the script is what you want. You can look on the internet for writer's group or form one of your own. Be careful about sharing your ideas in the future, though. It is a good idea to register them with the WGA and copywrite them with the Library of Congress, just to make sure no one steals them.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is there anyway to put dialogs under the videos?
    We make some videos, and we want to put the dialogs we say under the video. Like in a movie. We can read them while watching. I mean we want to put it under the video at the same time we say it. Like in films we watch. So we can understand it well, even if we can't understand the pronouncing well, because of the dialogs we put. So I want to do this. If anyone knows the answer for this, please answer my question, clearly because some people answer and they are hard to understand. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      ok. i do know how to add in dialogs in a home made short movie or video clips. but the only thing is... it takes time to add text. 'cause you have to sync all the words in the sound. literally. but if you're patient enough to do this then i think it'll be ok for you to try it. :)

      ok. what you need is either the adobe premiere pro or the adobe after effects (any version would be ok).

      premiere pro is easier to use, but after effects is a bit more complex. and you can do a lot of things in it than in premiere.

      - ok. you have to import your video in the after effects.
      - you'll find the T icon on top of the window, that's the text icon.
      - click on it. and go click it on the video screen where you'll find your video.
      - then type the dialog.

      but the tricky part is... you have to time the sound to where you gonna add the words.

      you have to play the video, stop at the point where they are about to say something, then add the words.. and over and over again until you finish the movie.

      you also have to add the text in the starting "frame" of each line/dialog.

      i know this will be hard to understand. it's hard to picture out what i'm talking about but it's not really that hard to add captions.

      i suggest you to get a copy of any of those programs and try the steps i mentioned. and you'll get the idea once you see the result. you'll learn how to adjust the text once you see how it works. either premiere or AE works fine.

  18. QUESTION:
    How can I write down a video idea?
    I love film making. I have made a few short videos, but they were all improv. I get ideas daily for video ideas, but I can's shoot them write away. I wanted to know how to write down the ideas. Not exactly a script, just the idea. I know it sounds stupid, but I don't know how to write my thoughts down. If you know ways I can do this, please let me know.

    Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I think I know what you are talking about (fingers crossed) and I think I have your solution. This is what I'd do. Do it like the pro's do,..make a story board! I'm sure you know what that is, but I'll pertend you don't. Draw a starting square on the piece of paper you are saving it on, That's your frame. (size of frame depends on how long your videos are going to be, and amount, how long) Draw a reference drawing of what would be in that frame of your video and a corresponding description (or dialog) under the frame. Now, I'm not suggesting that you do each frame in detail. Just the first frame, key events frames that you want to doccument throughout, and your end frame. I think that would be much shorter than writing a script? I am a graphic designer, so I always think in picture references. I know that is the way they start comic books, and I think they use them for movie ideas too. I really hope this helped, and we were on the same page! Yeah,.I know, bad pun. ~D~

  19. QUESTION:
    What should I major in if i want to be a tv drama writer?
    I want to write for television when I'm older. I have no Idea what I should major for. Play writing, Cinematography, film, screenwriting? What should my plan be?

    • ANSWER:
      There are some people who make a living from only writing screenplays. That's the good news... it IS possible to achieve that (screenwriting) as a career. The bad news is that not very many people manage to make it happen. But don't let that discourage you.

      We all have just one life to live and if screenwriting is something you truly want to do with your life, then do everything you can to not lose hope.

      This might mean taking on some other kind of work in the meantime, until someone realizes your talent or takes notice of your work.

      Having multiple examples of your work is a major plus. Too many people rely on that "one" script that they think is so brilliant that it can't be denied. The film/TV business is an art, but it is also a business. It costs a tremendous amount of money to create even the most modest of productions, so investors aren't interested in the most innovative "new" story possible. New, exciting, and innovative is great for investors, so long as the story is within a "safe" realm for them so that their investment isn't a total risk.

      Having multiple scripts to show is great for a couple reasons. First, it shows that you are serious about being a writer. Second, it gives you more examples to show of your talent. And third, the more examples you have, the more possibilities your have to sell something.

      There are people who make a living writing original screenplays. There are others who work steadily as "script doctors" who polish existing scripts. Then there are writers who are able to take that skill and make the jump into directing.

      Make sure your scripts are as good as they can be. Then, work to get them noticed by an established and reputable agent. Most professional Producers and studios will NOT even consider looking at unsolicited material. It MUST be submitted by an Agent. That affords the studio/Producer a measure of legal protection and it gives you a level of credibility (that someone else has recognized your talent).

      So how do you even start? Start writing today. Don't wait for school before you begin. Start small, by writing a few short stories in screenplay format. That will help you get comfortable with the style and format that is standard in the professional industry. Starting with smaller shorter stories also helps you to hone in on characters and plot so you learn how to get to the point quickly without extraneous scenes, dialogue, and characters. Once you feel you've grasped those concepts, begin work on the longer form screenplays.

      To get you started, there are a couple of resources that I HIGHLY recommend you read. They are listed below.

      In terms of what to study in school, by all means, choose a school that offers screenwriting courses. You likely should NOT major in filmmaking, but instead, concentrate more on topics that interest you, like Sociology, History, Political Science, and Business. Minor in Film/TV if you need to in order to take the classes, but you don't want to hyper-focus on filmmaking classes. As an aspiring writer, you need something to write ABOUT! Film/TV courses will teach you about film theory and some practical production, but as a writer, you need a broader base of knowledge so that your original stories and characters have a background that isn't film-centric.

      Given that, you MAY want to find a filmschool with a strong screenwriting program. For the most complete worldwide list of filmschools offered anywhere, go to http://www.whatireallywanttodo.com and click on the "Filmschools" link at the top of the page. You can search by location and easily find all of the schools available along with their current contact information. Research the schools that interest you then contact them with questions regarding your specific situation. Don't just take their word for it either... if possible, contact alumni to find out what they thought of their education. This is no small thing... you are investing thousands of dollars into YOUR own education and YOU need to make sure that you are spending your money as wisely as possible.

      But know that school alone will NOT get you job in the TV/Film business. YOU must put in the work to develop and build your career. Nobody will care if you have a diploma from the "best" school out there if you can't write entertaining stories and write them under pressure (time, budget, etc).

      Brian Dzyak
      Videographer/Writer
      Los Angeles, California
      IATSE Local 600, SOC
      http://www.whatireallywanttodo.com

  20. QUESTION:
    Is it smart to take these 2 program classes at Vancouver Film School?
    Im in high school and Im deeply considering VFS.
    Im planning to take "writing for film and television" then after earning my diploma in that...Im deciding to shoot for "film production" in VFS.
    Is this a smart idea?

    so pretty much 2 classes at the same school. One after the other.

    I want to hear your guys opinons..

    • ANSWER:
      No one can tell you what school is best for YOU. That's something only you can decide for yourself. Contact the school and ask very specific questions about what they will offer in terms of curriculum that will help you achieve your goals.

      There are some people who make a living from only writing screenplays. That's the good news... it IS possible to achieve that (screenwriting) as a career. The bad news is that not very many people manage to make it happen. But don't let that discourage you.

      We all have just one life to live and if screenwriting is something you truly want to do with your life, then do everything you can to not lose hope.

      This might mean taking on some other kind of work in the meantime, until someone realizes your talent or takes notice of your work.

      Having multiple examples of your work is a major plus. Too many people rely on that "one" script that they think is so brilliant that it can't be denied. The film/TV business is an art, but it is also a business. It costs a tremendous amount of money to create even the most modest of productions, so investors aren't interested in the most innovative "new" story possible. New, exciting, and innovative is great for investors, so long as the story is within a "safe" realm for them so that their investment isn't a total risk.

      Having multiple scripts to show is great for a couple reasons. First, it shows that you are serious about being a writer. Second, it gives you more examples to show of your talent. And third, the more examples you have, the more possibilities your have to sell something.

      There are people who make a living writing original screenplays. There are others who work steadily as "script doctors" who polish existing scripts. Then there are writers who are able to take that skill and make the jump into directing.

      Thousands of aspiring filmmakers graduate from the 700+ worldwide filmschools every year and only a scant percentage of them are able to claim that the film industry provides them with their primary income. And only a very small percentage of those ever get to direct a film. And only scant few of those get to direct more than one movie in their life. So the odds are extremely small that you will get to do this for a living. Not impossible, but definitely very difficult.

      Make sure your scripts are as good as they can be. Then, work to get them noticed by an established and reputable agent. Most professional Producers and studios will NOT even consider looking at unsolicited material. It MUST be submitted by an Agent. That affords the studio/Producer a measure of legal protection and it gives you a level of credibility (that someone else has recognized your talent).

      So how do you even start? Start writing today. Don't wait for school before you begin. Start small, by writing a few short stories in screenplay format. That will help you get comfortable with the style and format that is standard in the professional industry. Starting with smaller shorter stories also helps you to hone in on characters and plot so you learn how to get to the point quickly without extraneous scenes, dialogue, and characters. Once you feel you've grasped those concepts, begin work on the longer form screenplays.

      To get you started, there are a couple of resources that I HIGHLY recommend you read. They are listed below.

      In terms of what to study in school, by all means, choose a school that offers screenwriting courses. You likely should NOT major in filmmaking, but instead, concentrate more on topics that interest you, like Sociology, History, Political Science, and Business. Minor in Film/TV if you need to in order to take the classes, but you don't want to hyper-focus on filmmaking classes. As an aspiring writer, you need something to write ABOUT! Film/TV courses will teach you about film theory and some practical production, but as a writer, you need a broader base of knowledge so that your original stories and characters have a background that isn't film-centric.

      Given that, you MAY want to find a filmschool with a strong screenwriting program. For the most complete worldwide list of filmschools offered anywhere, go to http://www.whatireallywanttodo.com and click on the "Filmschools" link at the top of the page. You can search by location and easily find all of the schools available along with their current contact information. Research the schools that interest you then contact them with questions regarding your specific situation. Don't just take their word for it either... if possible, contact alumni to find out what they thought of their education. This is no small thing... you are investing thousands of dollars into YOUR own education and YOU need to make sure that you are spending your money as wisely as possible.

      But know that school alone will NOT get you job in the TV/Film business. YOU must put in the work to develop and build your career.

      Brian Dzyak
      Cameraman/Author
      IATSE Local 600, SOC

  21. QUESTION:
    Idea for a short film with no/very little dialogue?
    For our film class, we have to come up with an idea for a 3 min (approx) short film that uses little or no dialogue. We are graded on how we communicate the message visually. We also need some sort of uplifting/redemptive message. I go to a Christian school so a religious message would be great, but uplifting works too! Any suggestions?!?

    • ANSWER:
      Message- Do unto others....
      Film children playing and sharing. Adults (or kids) doing nice things for each other (holding the door open, waiting in line, mediating arguments, letting someone go first, patience, picking up items that somebody else dropped, picking up trash, recycling, etc....)
      No dialogue needed. Play some nice music in the background when you edit film. Don't be afraid to throw some still shots in your film. They could make great edit points (segways,transitions) for montage.
      Good luck!

  22. QUESTION:
    How do you set up a screenplay - for Media A level coursework.?
    I need some ideas on how to set it out and the layout and what I should include

    • ANSWER:
      Step 1
      Read a lot of scripts to get ideas

      Step 2
      Get inspiration. Walk around with a notebook or your BB to write down ideas.

      Step 3: Develop Your Characters
      If viewers don't care about your characters, they're more than likely going to lose interest in the movie. Characters that are cliché, flat, or unbelievable will drag down even the most creative of plots. Take the time to develop true-to-life characters, and they'll improve your story, whether it's comedy, suspense, or western. Write a short and compelling description of your main characters to use in the screenplay.

      Step 4: Structure Your Story
      A good movie needs to take the characters from point A to point B. Most screenplays follow a three-act structure, and each scene should contribute something to the story.
      Make a list of scenes and the things that will happen in each scene.
      Make sure there's a balance between dialogue and action; you wouldn't want the first half of the film to be all dialogue, followed by 45 minutes of car chases.

      Step 5: Write It Down
      Set a writing schedule and stick to it.
      Some people recommend to write every day, but if that's not feasible, just set a schedule that works for you.

      Step 6: Format It Correctly
      Some screenwriters format their scripts as they go; others use software that takes care of the work for them, and still others wait until the end and do all of the formatting after they've nailed down the first draft.

      Conclusion

      Screenwriting is a difficult process, but all of the hard work will be worth it when you see your film on the screen. If you take the time to learn the craft and develop the best script you possibly can, you'll stay ahead of your numerous competitors. Who knows? In a few years, you could be accepting an Oscar for Best Screenplay!

      Good luck
      AJ

  23. QUESTION:
    Idea for a short film with no/very little dialogue?
    For our film class, we have to come up with an idea for a 3 min (approx) short film that uses little or no dialogue. We are graded on how we communicate the message visually. We also need some sort of uplifting/redemptive message. I go to a Christian school so a religious message would be great, but uplifting works too! Any suggestions?!?

    • ANSWER:
      The lord has cursed you for your insolence, and none of you can speak, so you need to find a way to communicate to each other, and the lord, to show that you are worthy of his blessings again.

  24. QUESTION:
    i need help writing a short movie script?
    ok so im making a short film for class that deals with a film student that couldnt get ideas and ended up stealing one from the internet (ironic right?) but later wins an oscar for it and pays the price for taking someones idea without giving them credit.

    i just need something to fill 3 pages so i can turn in tomorrow and yes you will be named for credit lol. please help i really need this grade!

    • ANSWER:
      I'm in the same position as you mate, expect i have to make up a film, and film it :P.
      With the scenario you have you could focus on mainly the increasing build up of guilt within the character, like at first it doesn't bother him, then as he takes more and more credit the pressure of lying gets to him and turns him into a complete wreck. That one thing you can play with when making a film, the development of a character in that way. Ummmmmm if you need to fill three pages, take some time over the dialog and make sure that you give the lines some subtext, give interesting actions to the characters as they do their lines and make sure you include a range of camera shots in the 3 pages, a well shot film is always one worth watching ( even if the story is shit)
      I hope this helps man, if you want to talk about it in detail or need some help with anything give me and email.

      Titan D (A.J)

  25. QUESTION:
    How to write a sequence of shots using Screenwriter?
    I want to write a sequence of shots and time change (same style as seen in Up) using Screenwriter but I don't know the proper formatting style. Can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      Just focus on writing your story! Montage is what you are thinking of, but you really have NO need to even include that! Because the film editor and director will decide if they even want to do a montage. So how do you suggest a montage without doing it? Simple. Just write your scene heading and action:

      INT. HOUSE - DAY

      Janet reaches for the coffee pot, and knocks over the roses...

      If you do not include dialogue, and the action is short and sweet, your reader will get the idea.

  26. QUESTION:
    How should i keep myself entertained for the summer?
    I'm trying to think of some ideas besides hanging out with friends to have fun this summer so i dont get super bored

    • ANSWER:
      Hmm...

      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Art
      -Sketch something. You could pick a person, a plant, a landscape, etc... anything you desire! Many people find sketching fun because it is not messy (you usually just use a pencil and a piece of paper).
      Paint. Once again, you can pick anything you want as an inspiration. And remember, you do not have to be good at it to have fun with painting! Abstract art is sometimes more beautiful and fun to do than concrete art.
      -Make a funny comic. If you enjoy drawing your own characters, this is for you. To make it more fun, just draw the pictures, excluding the dialogue. Have a friend or family member put their own funny conversation along with your pictures.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Writing
      -Write in a journal. This is not only something to pass the time, but it can also help give you insight into your life. Write down your feelings, thoughts, dreams -- anything you want. It might be fun to look back on another Saturday night that you are in the same position!
      -Write a short story. Everyone has something that they can write about, be it a personal experience or something that they only dreamed of. A short story could also be a gift to someone you know.
      -Write poetry. Channel the Longfellow in you! Like painting, you can be inspired by anything. Poetry is just drawing a picture with words.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Nature
      -Take a stroll in a park. This is a great way to reconnect to the world we live in. You probably never noticed that bird's nest in the tree before, did you? And besides that, walking is great exercise!
      -Go star-gazing. You can do this anywhere -- laying in your yard, the bed of your truck,... the list goes on. You could even bring a telescope out and see if you can find some popular constellations.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Music
      -Write lyrics for a song. Another great way to express yourself. The song could be about ladybugs and fireflies for all that anyone else cares -- this is about you writing what you feel. You could even write a parody for a song you like (or even dislike!); people get a lot of hits on YouTube for parodies!
      -Play an instrument. Do you remember that guitar sitting in your closet -- the one you promised Mom that you would practice really hard at? Well, now is your chance. Some websites offer free online courses to teach you to play instruments, so it would only cost you a little of your time (which you have plenty of to spare)!
      -Sing 'till your heart is content. The radio, not to mention your computer, CD player, and/or mp3 player always has music available right at your fingertips. Even if you are not alone in the house, go into another room and shut the door.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Movie
      -Watch a movie. Movies come out every day, and people at school/work are always talking about some kind of movie that they saw or want to see. So why not join in? Some television providers offer free movies as part of your package, so find out if your's does. If not, some television stations show movies during the nighttime. But, of course, there are always those old stand-bys -- rent a movie or watch one at a theatre!
      -Translate a movie into another language. If you are bilingual, or even just semi-fluent in another language, you could watch a foreign film and try to pick out words you know. If you get tired of that, though, you can make up your own dialogue to go with the story!
      -Make your own movie. Camera phone, Webcam, video recorder... it does not matter! Be goofy, be serious, be dramatic. This is your movie -- make it into whatever you want.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Crafts
      -Knit something. Not only relaxing, but yet another great gift idea! People love it when you take the time to hand-make them a gift; it is so much more personal and thoughtful than going out and buying a giftcard. Your grandmother always cool during her morning coffee? Knit her a shawl or a blanket -- she will love you forever!
      -Make models of objects. Yet again, it does not matter what it is. This, too, is also a good gifting idea. Say that your little brother loves airplanes. You could find out ways to make an airplane using just about any crafts medium, be it paper, wooden sticks, pipe-cleaners, etc.
      -Stain glass. There are not many things more beautiful than seeing light through a colored glass. This would also be something fun you could do to make a Christmas ornament.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Exercise
      -Go biking. Just because you are riding a bicycle does not mean that you have to be outside! You can ride a stationary bike inside, or if you are daring enough, ride an actual bike inside!
      -Jog. Once again, not something you have to be outside for. If you can find a flat, sturdy surface to jog on, then you can put on your running shoes and do it wherever you please! It is great exercise.
      -Go swimming. This option depends on the season, the weather, and, of course, whether or not you have access to a pool. If all of the conditions are right, though, put on

  27. QUESTION:
    Would writing a script be a good first step to writing a book?
    I have considered many writing methods and since my main style is to picture it as if it were a movie in my head and then describe the story scene on paper, would it be beneficial to write a script with dialogue and short blurbs of direction before expanding into a full blown story?

    • ANSWER:
      No. There is a reason why books come first and *then* films come out of them (yes, cheap ghost-written 'novelisations' are sometimes produced of really big movies, but they aren't written by well-known writers and they aren't big sellers and they aren't taken seriously as books, only as movie tie-in merchandise). It is almost never possible to create a really good book from a movie - whereas of course, you can create a really good movie from a book.

      There's also a reason why movie adaptations of books cut out a lot of detail and change a lot of scenes and even rejig plots - it's because a book is a far more in-depth, far more detailed, far less *visual* realisation of a person's ideas.

      One of the biggest mistakes that first-time writers often make is imagining a movie and then trying to write it as a book. If you imagine something as a movie, write it as a movie. If that's how your imagination works, be a script-writer, not a novelist. Scriptwriting is just as a valid a discipline as novel writing. If you find that better suits you - which, to be honest, from your question it really sounds like it does - write a script. If you're imagining a movie, that's what it should be. Not a description of a movie masquerading as a book.

  28. QUESTION:
    Ideas for a 1 minute silent video with no actors/actresses?
    I'm making a small one minute video for my video class assignment, and unfortunately my good actors are unable to do it at all so now Im trying to come up with a new idea. Any suggestions? I really need help.

    • ANSWER:
      You can take inanimate objects (dolls, chairs, balloons) and give them personality through movement. In between shots of the, let's say chairs for example, you can hold up a card in front of the camera with written dialogue or written pieces of a short story (can do the written words with a computer too if you know how to do such a thing). You can also give the illusion that the 'chairs' are moving on their own by carefully placing them a certain way, film it & pause it, then move them 1/2 an inch, film & pause, move them 1/2 inch again etc. Or you could just move them for the different shots after you cut back from showing part of the written story on screen. Think of it as live animation.

  29. QUESTION:
    I'm interested in shooting a short film?
    I'm 16... soon to be 17. I'm not really thinking I want to be a director or anything but my grandpa was a director, producer, screenwriter and storyboard person... we were talking about it recently and I became interested in possibly shooting a short film... he told me to go for it.

    I'm an artist.. and that's what I plan to do with my life. I really enjoy concept art and I'm thinking about maybe going for video game concept art in the future, after college and such.

    So.. I already have some characters that I'd really really love to make a 15 minute film with. The thing is.. I have no idea how much it would cost. I would be directing it but I would also be one of the characters. I can make the costumes on my own because I have very good sewing experience. I can do hair and makeup. I'll really only have two or three characters in this film, including me. There will be other characters but they're not actually human.. basically it's just ghost things that I'll tie to fishing line and swing around lol. There will be no dialogue.. I just want it to have music.. no background noises even so we wouldn't need a boom. As for the music I think I'll compose it myself. I have a little recording studio set up in my house because I play guitar, so does my dad, and my friend's mom plays the bass.. like the classical bass.. she's in a symphony and I think she'd gladly do a bass line for me. My friend, her daughter, plays the cello so I could get her to do something too. As for location.. I really need a pine forest.. well.. I mean.. it's not absolutely necessary but it would be nice. There IS a great spot I've been to in New Hampshire that would be great for shooting... the thing is that it's about 2 miles into the woods.. how would I have power for the camera and possible lights?

    And finally.. the camera.. I feel like that's going to be my only real expense. I'd like to use a nice one... because I want it to be high quality.. the thing is that I have no idea how to use one of those big lunking ones. I'd need a camera that's capable of getting high enough quality shots that I could put them in slow motion.. because for the ghost things I mentioned.. to get them to flow I have to move them fast, but for the final thing I have to have them in slow motion to make them move all erie like. So.. how much does it cost to rent a nice camera? I don't want to buy one until I know I really like doing this... and what kind of camera would I even want to use?

    For after it's all done.. I have no idea what I'd even do with the film.. I don't know how comfortable I feel with putting it on youtube because people are kind of assholes there. I'm obviously open to criticism but not from total jerks. I'm hoping for this film to come out really nice looking visually... I feel like I should share it somewhere if I do.. but I don't really know where. Originally it was just going to be for myself for fun. So.. what do I do with it once I'm finished?

    Is there anything else I should know?

    • ANSWER:
      YouTube is where all the people become famous come from. Don't loose hope despite the criticism who knows it could be famous. Also you said your grandpa was a producer etc... You could ask him for help since he could know a lot of people in the industry. do what you love :) hope I helped

  30. QUESTION:
    I have to film a movie of type film noir. It is due in 2 days, and i can only use myself as a subject. Help :)?
    I don't know what to film, please give me ideas. I am the only one allowed in the film.
    I have no access to any greenscreen or such.

    The end result should be 5 minutes, i would preferably choose to base my film on a horror.

    • ANSWER:
      Wow, why such a short time frame?

      Just writing the script and shooting it could take at least that long and then you have all the post production like editing, laying in sound, Foley and music.

      I guess to get the flavor of the old time cinematic to describe a stylish Hollywood crime drama with emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations, I would shoot a lot of night shots with fog machines running like crazy and convert the whole video to black and white in the final cut.

      Sheesh. This sounds more like TV news feature stuff on a short deadline

      By you playing all the parts, you may have to shoot the other "actor(s)", you, against chroma key and insert yourself into the "live" scenes in post How good are you at using different voices?

      This could be a fun project, but I would think 2 weeks rather than two days. Yikes!

      NOTE: You did not tell us what the final cut runtime is supposed to be? Ten minutes? Less?

      NOTE2:

      You could do a dramatic version of Stan Freebergs "hole in the fence" Bang Gunleigh, US Marshall Field

      Night shot, close up of hole in fence and one leg wearing slacks and wingtip shoes and the other leg in some high heel shoes all with dramatic lighting and a fog generator adding to the drama. A hand and lower arm with dangley jewelry and a mans with long sleeved French cuff to reach down that touch the hole in the fence. The dialog could be just as simple as Stan Freebergs in that classic radio show.

      Good luck

  31. QUESTION:
    How can I write a good plot?
    I love writing good characters, relationships, and dialogue. What I have trouble with is the actual plot... I would consider myself generally a creative person, but are there any tips or guides on how to come up with plots? I like details, so I can never really form a vague idea and narrow it down. I have to write stories from the inside out, which is sorta difficult and at times annoying.

    • ANSWER:
      huh?, Supafrog, and i.wish each give you different, but excellent advise. If you combined them, it brings you close to the almost perfect answer.(In truth there really is none)

      The more you experience in film, life or books will dramatically increase the odds of overcoming plot building difficulties. (TV not so much, but it seemed to help Supafrog. I depends on what you watch. For me, life outside my house can be much more interesting)
      Without conflict there is no point in continuing to read on, no movement to the story, no way to truly develop your characters.
      And brainstorming really does work. Write everything down no matter how silly it may seem at the moment. It frequently leads you to newer and better ideas. Inspiration and stray ideas are fickle monsters that will run the second they see you looking in their general direction. So write them down as they come to you and don't wait too long or else you might loose them.

      The only other things I could add to these great suggestions are:

      1-When you do finally get an idea for some conflict/problem/struggle, write it down on a piece of paper. Just below it list at least three different solutions to the problem. The first one will be the most predicable, but by the time you come to the third, fourth, etc., the solutions will become progressively harder for the reader to foresee and make it much more interesting. (source: Storytelling by Kate Wilhelm) I found this to be a great help to me.

      2-Try changing your Point of View. Sometimes this will surprise you by looking at it from a completely different view. Some 3rd person accounts sound too impersonal and would be better coming from the mind of the main char. Sometimes 1st person views fall short since, apart from their perceived reactions, the storyteller can't account for other characters' inner thoughts.

      3-Getting stuck on plot development happens to the best of us. Sometimes shelving something-as counterproductive as this might seem-for a while before looking at it again will help give you a fresh perspective on it and finally break the writer's block like it did for i.wish.

      Remember too, that are are always some stories that simply don't want to be written and to force them out only makes them sound trite, too far-fetched or stereotypical. So don't get discouraged when each and every piece you're working on falls short of your expectations. I have a bunch of unfinished works that I now use like my "parts cars". They don't run, but a lot of the parts I take from them and transfer to my other projects still work great.

  32. QUESTION:
    How can I make this lonely weekend fun?
    ALL my friends are going to an amusement park tomorrow morning until late Saturday night for the school choir trip. I wont be attending school tomorrow but I'll be so lonely. How do I have a fun-filled weekend by myself? I've been crying all night because I feel so so so excluded.

    • ANSWER:
      Aw!
      Don't worry about it!

      Hmm...

      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Art
      -Sketch something. You could pick a person, a plant, a landscape, etc... anything you desire! Many people find sketching fun because it is not messy (you usually just use a pencil and a piece of paper).
      Paint. Once again, you can pick anything you want as an inspiration. And remember, you do not have to be good at it to have fun with painting! Abstract art is sometimes more beautiful and fun to do than concrete art.
      -Make a funny comic. If you enjoy drawing your own characters, this is for you. To make it more fun, just draw the pictures, excluding the dialogue. Have a friend or family member put their own funny conversation along with your pictures.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Writing
      -Write in a journal. This is not only something to pass the time, but it can also help give you insight into your life. Write down your feelings, thoughts, dreams -- anything you want. It might be fun to look back on another Saturday night that you are in the same position!
      -Write a short story. Everyone has something that they can write about, be it a personal experience or something that they only dreamed of. A short story could also be a gift to someone you know.
      -Write poetry. Channel the Longfellow in you! Like painting, you can be inspired by anything. Poetry is just drawing a picture with words.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Nature
      -Take a stroll in a park. This is a great way to reconnect to the world we live in. You probably never noticed that bird's nest in the tree before, did you? And besides that, walking is great exercise!
      -Go star-gazing. You can do this anywhere -- laying in your yard, the bed of your truck,... the list goes on. You could even bring a telescope out and see if you can find some popular constellations.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Music
      -Write lyrics for a song. Another great way to express yourself. The song could be about ladybugs and fireflies for all that anyone else cares -- this is about you writing what you feel. You could even write a parody for a song you like (or even dislike!); people get a lot of hits on YouTube for parodies!
      -Play an instrument. Do you remember that guitar sitting in your closet -- the one you promised Mom that you would practice really hard at? Well, now is your chance. Some websites offer free online courses to teach you to play instruments, so it would only cost you a little of your time (which you have plenty of to spare)!
      -Sing 'till your heart is content. The radio, not to mention your computer, CD player, and/or mp3 player always has music available right at your fingertips. Even if you are not alone in the house, go into another room and shut the door.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Movie
      -Watch a movie. Movies come out every day, and people at school/work are always talking about some kind of movie that they saw or want to see. So why not join in? Some television providers offer free movies as part of your package, so find out if your's does. If not, some television stations show movies during the nighttime. But, of course, there are always those old stand-bys -- rent a movie or watch one at a theatre!
      -Translate a movie into another language. If you are bilingual, or even just semi-fluent in another language, you could watch a foreign film and try to pick out words you know. If you get tired of that, though, you can make up your own dialogue to go with the story!
      -Make your own movie. Camera phone, Webcam, video recorder... it does not matter! Be goofy, be serious, be dramatic. This is your movie -- make it into whatever you want.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Crafts
      -Knit something. Not only relaxing, but yet another great gift idea! People love it when you take the time to hand-make them a gift; it is so much more personal and thoughtful than going out and buying a giftcard. Your grandmother always cool during her morning coffee? Knit her a shawl or a blanket -- she will love you forever!
      -Make models of objects. Yet again, it does not matter what it is. This, too, is also a good gifting idea. Say that your little brother loves airplanes. You could find out ways to make an airplane using just about any crafts medium, be it paper, wooden sticks, pipe-cleaners, etc.
      -Stain glass. There are not many things more beautiful than seeing light through a colored glass. This would also be something fun you could do to make a Christmas ornament.
      *.:。✿*゚゚・✿.。.:*
      Exercise
      -Go biking. Just because you are riding a bicycle does not mean that you have to be outside! You can ride a stationary bike inside, or if you are daring enough, ride an actual bike inside!
      -Jog. Once again, not something you have to be outside for. If you can find a flat, sturdy surface to jog on, then you can put on your running shoes and do it wherever you please! It is great exercise.
      -Go swimming. This option depends on the season, the weather, and, of course, whether or not you have access to a pool. If all of the conditions are right, though, put on

  33. QUESTION:
    What should I do for this movie that I'm making?
    So for english we're doing film studies and one of the assignments is to make a short film. Now I've got a few ideas in my head.
    1. a mockumentary about a bunch of students making a movie.
    2. A strange sort of movie thats kinda stereotypical short film.
    Anyways I'd like some feedback and some new ideas PLEEAASSE! Any help is appreciated. Btw the thing has 2 be 3 minutes give or take.

    • ANSWER:
      3 minutes is not enough time to make a mockumentary. I'd like to you expand some details to the "strange, stereotypical short film" you had in mind before commenting on that.

      Is there an objective for your English class for making these shorts? Just to a spoof off of That 70's Show when they rotate the camera around the table when they get high. Or do an all-action, no dialogue short of someone simply, idk walking through the park and maybe witnessing some weird things.

      Let me know what you decide.

  34. QUESTION:
    I need a monologue for a 12 year old girl?
    Okay so I'm a 14 year old female actor and I attend a small drama class every saturday morning. We recently performed a short performance of 'five children and it' in which I played Jane. I really enjoyed the experience and apparently, I was pretty good!

    Anyway, so there was this casting director there looking for fresh new faces and after wards I got invited to go along to audition for a supporting role in a new itv drama (that's all the information I was told) and if I got through to the next stage of auditions later that day, I need a short monologue prepared.

    The character I am auditioning for is a 12 year old girl ( I look young for my age) who has no memory of her parents or past life as she was orphaned at just five years old. she is very bright but also most of the time 'in her own world' daydreaming.

    so any ideas for a short monologue, from a film preferably for this type of character? It can either be written (Im not very good at script writing though) or recited.

    • ANSWER:
      If you need a monologue rather than a dialogue, build off of the fact that you have no parents, but you have the wonders of the world at your feet and you're able to see the goodness of life and bring the audience away from the bad things of life. I'm not good at script writing, but if you look hard enough into an idea you'll come up with something, I had to write a monologue about Cabbage patch dolls for a play, later my idea got cut though.

  35. QUESTION:
    How to write a screenplay when I haven't wrote the story yet?
    See,I haven't wrote the story of my "movie" yet,because it would take too long to WRITE it the whole thing.All I have wrote are excerpts of the movie as if I'm writing it like I'm writing a novel.I know nothing about writing a screenplay,so would I have to write the story?I mean,I know the plot & all that,it's my "movie".But how do I write a screenplay?Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Before you start writing any screenplay, you first need to learn the basic format in which all directors, producers, actors, and anyone affiliated with film production uses to read and film screenplays. You can do that by reviewing the information on www.screenwriting.info and other websites found on Google. Key word to search is "screenplay format"

      Once proficient in screenplay formatting, you can move on to the next step which is software. You need a software that has built in formatting options that will allow you to write without worrying about where to place the scene heading, action, dialogue, etc. There are many softwares that professionals use that you can purchase like Final Draft and Movie Magic Screenwriter, but I use Celtx 2.9 because it's free and it works fine.

      Now you can start with the screenplay itself. First, you need an idea and concept of what the film will be about which is usually a short brief sentence like the current idea you probably got in your head right now.

      From that idea comes the plot which will mold your concept into a short one page story which will allow you to better visualize how the film will unfold. I had a problem shaping my movie ideas into a plot too until I realized that no one eats an apple whole. So I decided to break the plot into small subplots in which I can properly write each part of the story individually.

      It's a known fact to screenwriters that screenplays nowadays are around 90 to 120 pages in length and each page is roughly 1 minute of onscreen film. Me knowing that decided to write my screenplays 100 pages long, which allowed me to break the 100 pages (minutes) into twenty 5 page subplots which makes it easy to write a plot. But make sure the subplots connect together and flow smoothly as a whole plot or the story might seem off and a bit weird.

      Before writing the plot story, you should create the main characters. A protagonist and a bad guy both optionally having other characters helping them try achieving their goals, pushing the story forward.

      All main and semi-main characters should have personalities of their own and their own goal or problem creating complications for the main characters but helping them succeed. Conflicts should be surprising by deceive the audience through your characters decisions and hidden agendas. Make the audience think the characters want to do 'this' but surprise them by revealing he wanted to do 'that'. The characters should also interact with the environment around them.

      After completing your screenplay you'd want to copyright it because who wants someone stealing the screenplay they wrote and selling it claiming it's theirs. Professional screenwriters don't usually copyright their scripts through the Federal Government because it's a large speed-bump when selling it. What they do is register it with WGA (The Writers Guild of America) so they can avoid the bump in the road and attach their name to it.

      That's basically the process screenwriters go through when creating a masterpiece and selling their product.

      http://www.scriptfrenzy.org/eng/howtoguides is a good site that explains "how to" and screenwriting in detail. There are many other sites all over the web where you can learn the tricks and tips of screenwriting.

      A black hole just opened up outside my house, so I've got to be going. Have fun creating your feature and enjoy! 😀

  36. QUESTION:
    What are some really good free Text-to-Speech natural sounding voices?
    I know this sounds a bit stupid, and you've got every right to laugh, but I'm making an animated film and I can't find a actor to play a 16 year old female character. I have some Text to Speech programs installed on my computer, would I be able to download any REALLY NATURAL voices for free anywhere?

    Another option could be to use software to change my voice, I suppose. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Check out YAKiToMe! http://www.yakitome.com. It has a bunch of high-quality AT&T Natural Voices that you can use for free. I know a bunch of people making animated shorts that use YAKiToMe! to do the dialog.

  37. QUESTION:
    Why is Breaking Dawn the last twilight book?
    I have two little sisters that say someone sued Stephanie Meyer or something, is that true?

    • ANSWER:
      April 20, 2009

      Stephanie Meyer, the writer behind the wildly successful Twilight book, is being sued by a former friend for plagiarism--and production on the follow up, New Moon has been halted as a result.

      Heidi Stanton, who studied alongside Meyer at Brigham Young University in Utah claims Meyers stole the vampire story from her because it's very similar to a short story she wrote while they were attending college together.

      Stanton filed her lawsuit against Meyer in Utah last Tuesday, April 14th alleging idea infringement. She states in the papers, "Quite frankly, I was shocked when I began watching the movie with my husband last week. I immediately told him that she got that idea from me! I wrote a fictional short story with the same ideas when we were in college together."

      Meyer’s claims the storyline of the popular series came to her in a dream back in 2003. She completed Twilight three months later.

      Production of New Moon has since been "put on hold" until the case is resolved. It's scheduled for release at the end of the year, so we hope they speed this process along.

      Read more: http://www.hollyscoop.com/news/twilight-writer-sued-for-plagiarism_19964.aspx#ixzz0kFDJaTmU

      Stephenie Meyer, the author who wrote the four “Twilight” books that Summit Entertainment is now turning into highly successful films, is about to be sued by another, less rich and less famous author, who claims the forth book is actually her own material. As Meyer’s publicist is denying accusations of plagiarism, Jordan Scott, the author of “The Nocturne,” is adamant the matter will go to trial, as her attorney says in a cease and desist letter sent to Meyer’s publishing house.

      “The Nocturne” was written in 2003, Scott argues in the aforementioned letter and then, as she worked on it, pages and entire chapters from it were made available online, which means Meyer could have had the chance to look them up and then be “inspired” by them. The fact that the fourth book in the “Twilight” series, “Breaking Dawn,” came out years after “The Nocturne” is a clear indication for Scott that she was ripped off and now someone else is making a lot of money on her story.

      “In a cease-and-desist letter Williams [Scott’s attorney] sent to Hachette Book Group, he provided comparisons from the two books of a wedding and a passage where a human-turned-vampire describes the wrenching change,” along with an episode where the two main characters make love on the beach, Reuters says. “As another instance of similarities, Williams pointed out that characters in both books call their wives ‘love.’” the same media outlet adds.

      The cease-and-desist letter that should determine the Hachette Book Group to stop selling all copies of Meyer’s “Breaking Dawn” also includes passages that Scott considers were used as the main source of inspiration for passages in the fourth “Twilight” book. Moreover, the letter says, Meyer even lifted off entire passages with dialog from “The Nocturne,” bothering very little to alter them so that the similarity pass unnoticed. Williams points out that Scott will be filing her lawsuit in court sometime this week, but, surprisingly, she will not ask for monetary damages.

      In the meantime, the Hachette Book Group is defending Meyer, saying that the “Twilight” saga has now reached such levels of exposure that less known authors are trying to use it as a vehicle for their own shot at fame. “The claim that ‘Breaking Dawn’ by Stephenie Meyer somehow infringes on an alleged book by someone named Jordan Scott is completely without merit. Neither Stephenie Meyer nor her representatives had any knowledge of this writer or her supposed book prior to this claim.” a statement from the publishing house reads.

      http://news.softpedia.com/news/Twilight-Author-Accused-of-Plagiarism-on-Breaking-Dawn-118438.shtml

  38. QUESTION:
    I am trying to write a novel but keep getting stuck?
    everytime I begin to write something I get annoyed and delete it. I know i am meant to try to write a bit everyday and not delete no matter how rubbish it is. But the idea of writing something i will never keep always makes me wanna delete it.

    • ANSWER:
      You can find inspiration anywhere!!

      Blogs. This is one of my favorites, of course. Aside from this blog, there are dozens of great blogs on writing and every topic under the sun. I like to read about what works for others — it inspires me to action!
      Books. Maybe my favorite overall. I read writers I love (read about my current loves) and then I steal from them, analyze their writing, get inspired by their greatness. Fiction is my favorite, but I’ll devour anything. If you normally read just a couple of your favorite authors, try branching out into something different. You just might find new inspiration.
      Overheard dialog. If I’m anywhere public, whether it be at a park or a mall or my workplace, sometimes I’ll eavesdrop on people. Not in a gross way or anything, but I’ll just keep quiet, and listen. I love hearing other people have conversations. Sometimes it doesn’t happen on purpose — you can’t help but overhear people sometimes. If you happen to overhear a snippet of interesting dialog, jot it down in your writing journal as soon as possible. It can serve as a model or inspiration for later writing.
      Magazines. Good magazines aren’t always filled with great writing, but you can usually find one good piece of either fiction or non-fiction. Good for its writing style, its voice, its rhythm and ability to pull you along to the end. These pieces inspire me. And bad magazines, while perhaps not the best models for writing, can still be inspirations for ideas for good blog posts. These magazines, as they don’t draw readers with great writing, find interesting story angles to attract an audience.
      Movies. Sometimes, while watching a movie, a character will say something so interesting that I’ll say, “That would make a great blog post!” or “I have to write that in my writing journal!” Sometimes screenwriters can write beautiful dialog. Other times I get inspired by the incredible camera work, the way that a face is framed by the camera, the beauty of the landscape captured on film.
      Forums. When people write on forums, they rarely do so for style or beauty (there are exceptions, of course, but they’re rare). Forumers are writing to convey information and ideas. Still, those ideas can be beautiful and inspiring in and of themselves. They can inspire more ideas in you. I’m not saying you have to read a wide array of forums every day, but if you’re looking for information, trawling some good forums isn’t a bad idea.
      Art. For the writer aspiring to greater heights, there is no better inspiration that great art, in my experience. While it doesn’t compare to the experience of seeing the art in person, I like to find inspiring works of art and put it on my computer desktop for contemplation (Michelangelo’s Pieta is there right now). It doesn’t have to be classical works, though — I’ve found inspiration in Japanese anime, in stuff I’ve found on deviantart.com, in local artists in my area.
      Music. Along the same lines, it can be inspiring to download and play great music, from Mozart to Beethoven to the Beatles to Radiohead. Play it in the background as you write, and allow it to lift you up and move you.
      Friends. Conversations with my friends, in real life, on the phone or via IM, have inspired some of my best posts. They stir up my ideas, contribute ideas of their own, and they fuse into something even more brilliant than either of us could have created.
      Writing groups. Whether online or in your community, writing groups are great ways to get energy and motivation for your writing. My best short stories were done in a writing group in my local college (a great place to look for such groups, btw), as we read out our work to the group, critiqued them and made suggestions. The work of the other writers inspired me to do better.
      The Pocket Muse. A book full of writing inspirations. Can’t beat that!
      Quotes. I don’t know why it’s so, but great quotes help inspire me. I like to go to various quote sites to find ideas to spark my writing, turns of phrase that show what can be done with the language, motivation for self-improvement. Try these for a start: Writing Quotes and Quotes for Writers.
      Nature. Stuck for ideas? Go for a walk or a jog. Get away from sidewalks and into grass and trees and fields and hills. Appreciate the beauty around you, and let the inspiration flow through you. Sunsets and sunrises, of course, are two of my favorite uplifting scenes of nature, and anything involving water is also awesome (oceans, rivers, lakes, rain, rivulets, even puddles).
      History. It can be unexpected, but great people in history can inspire you to greatness. My favorites include Benjamin Franklin, Gandhi, Abraham Lincoln, Helen Keller, Leonardo da Vinci, and other greats.
      Travel. Whether it be halfway around the world, or a day trip to the next town or national park, getting out of your usual area and discovering new places and people and customs can be one of the best inspirations for writing. Use these new places to o

  39. QUESTION:
    What's a good external microphone for the Sony SR11?
    I just got a Sony SR11 camera and I was wondering what a good external microphone is.

    I have a pretty limited budget and I'd be using the microphone to create short films, with dialogue, multiple characters, and camera action (also some actual action)

    I was looking at the official sony ECMHW1 mic.... any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      I video a lot of performances, such as school plays, usually from the rear of the auditorium. Than means my camcorder mic also records a lot of noise from the audience - papers shuffling, people making comments, and sometimes the ventilation system is loud.

      Using this wireless mic vastly improved the audio portion of my recordings. I use the "mono" setting rather than the "center channel". I can now laugh and cheer during the performances without recording myself!!!

      I also built a "sound barrier" by lining a cardboard box with carpet. I put the mic in the box with the opening facing the stage. That helped further cut back on noise from the audience and ventilation system. When the mic was way inside the box, it gave a muffled sound, but when it was near the opening it worked great. (Always test first, before recording a one-time event.)

      The range is fantastic - at least as well as advertised.

      I wish I had some clue how long the AAA batteries last in the mic/transmitter. I recorded a 3-hour play with no problem, but put in fresh ones before the next performance. I'd hate to have them run out in the middle of the play, and I have no idea if they last for 4 hours or 40 hours. If you are doing an interview, it's not a big deal because you could interrupt and pause to put in new batteries.

      For my purposes, I wish it was a "stereo" mic, but for the more typical use, where you mic an individual, mono makes sense. I do not subtract any points for it given the price and the fact that I knew this before purchasing.

      Better sound greatly improves your "video". I recommend this product.

      List Price: 9.99
      Price: 0.29 free shipping
      You Save: .70
      reference: http://www.amazon.com/Sony-ECMHW1-Microphone-DVR-DVD405-Camcorders/dp/B000EC8WEU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1231418989&sr=8-1&tag=commentglitte-20&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325

      hope that help

  40. QUESTION:
    A thesis for a compare/contrast essay on The Birds story and film?
    For my honors english class we read the short story The Birds and watched the film. Now we have to write a compare/contrast essay. Problem is I can't think up a thesis (statement that can be argued). I need two arguments for contrast and two arguments for compare. An example would be there were more symbols in the film than the movie but everyone in my class is doing that one so I want something more creative. And I need it by tonight...any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      The audience is able to connect to the story of The Birds using very different methods. The film uses visual effects to make the audience, while the short story uses style and language to create an emotional connection. In the end, the audience is still left with a sense of horror and contemplation over the possibility of nature uprising against humanity.

      Contrast the films' dialog with the books' dialog.

      Compare how your reaction is the same despite differences.

      Hope that helps.

      Can you please answer my survey? http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AhHiCxYF_74LYr8HT4LXaFfsy6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20090302185612AAgnndO

      FYI: I'm a teacher.

  41. QUESTION:
    Should I write a book or a screenplay?
    It is loosely based on a true story. It is about a young girl who was having problems with her family, so she sneaked out of her house & met a group of new friends. There is romance, violence, sadness, & forgivness. I may be able to make a series of books with this story. It is a work in progress, so I can't give the whole plot away!

    Is it easier to have a book then turn it into a screenplay or vis versa?
    Who should I get to edit it?
    How many pages is too many pages for a book?
    Is a screenplay really only 20 pages long?
    Is it better to publish the book yourslef?
    Is it better to copyright the book yourself or go through an angency?

    If you can answer any of my questions, I would appreaciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, if you want to be successful at writing, you need to really, really WANT to write. It is a long road which requires discipline, determination and drive. When and if you get someone to read your work they rarely give you positive feedback. You'll be told to rewrite, rip it apart, and start all over again.

      So whatever you want to write, start with an outline. Know where want to go and make your words count. Find a book or screenplay that you like. That will give you a good idea of how your story can be put together.

      Figure out your market. If it's a series of books, are you aiming at the teenage audience? Romance? Mystery? Same thing for movies. What genre? Each audience has a specific formula and you'll want to taylor your work to one of them.

      In screenplays, one page usually equals about one minute of film. A short can be 15 to 20 pages but a feature film is 90-120 pages. Many screenplays are available on-line (like simplyscripts.com).

      Screenplays are written with very definite structure where every word of dialogue and description count. But writing a good screenplay is one-tenth the work. Getting someone to buy it (then actually make the movie) will take everything you've got.

      Good luck.

  42. QUESTION:
    getting your screenplay turned into a movie?
    If you think you have a good unique screenplay, is it very difficult to attempt to get your screenplay turned into an actual movie? Do you have to have a lot of connections to have a chance at getting it to work? How do you go about getting your screenplay looked at?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends on what scale movie you hope to get your screenplay turned into. There are independent film makers who are always looking for scripts - so if you don't mind a low-budget indy film maker doing your film, then you probably have a fairly good chance. Shop it around to the local film companies.

      However, if you want to go for a big Hollywood film - it's going to be a bit tougher. You will want to get your screenplay a proper copyright through The Library of Congress. This is actually pretty easy to do and doesn't cost very much. This will help protect your work, if you shop it around and someone ends up stealing your idea.

      To submit to Hollywood, you really should have a literary agent to submit for you. Just like actor submissions, they don't usually look at unsolicited scripts or headshots (sent in by the writer or the actor on their own instead of through an agent.) Also, when you submit writing, you send a treatment of your script - not the full script itself - at least in the beginning until you get them interested.

      A treatment is a synopsis that describes each of the scenes in a screenplay. Think of a synopsis as a story outline. A treatment for a spec script should summarize and dramatize the script, using dialogue and descriptions to describe the beginning, middle, and end of the story. The treatment can be up to seven pages long. But it's usually about four pages. It's similar to a short story.

      It's always a good idea to have your screenplay evaluated by a professional script analyst before submitting it to film production companies and/or agents.

      In order to secure a deal, you will definitely need an agent. Due to legal liability issues, production companies will only give you a contract if your script has been submitted by a literary agent.

      So, prior to submitting your script to a qualified agent, make sure you've thoroughly refined it. A trusted script analyst can help you do that by giving you comprehensive guidelines for revisions.

      So to answer your questions - if you go for indy films - you don't need to have tons of connections or even a literary agent to submit your screenplay and have it turned into a film.

      If you want to go for a big Hollywood production company, then you need to have a literary agent - who will be the one who submits it for you and would have the connections needed - so YOU don't need to have a lot of connections.

      Good luck!

  43. QUESTION:
    Ideas for short film about willpower?
    It can only be one minute long, does not need to be a complex story or even have dialogue. Anything that is a represenation of willpower.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      How about have a group of kids pressuring a friend to try drugs and alcohol, but the person resists peer pressure and walks away

  44. QUESTION:
    for film class i have to make a short film?
    so the film has to be like 3 minutes, and im stuck at home.. its too cold to do outside so i have to work with what i have in my house. any ideas what i can make my movie about? thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Your instructor is looking for talent, technique, and effort. Make sure everything is clean and the details are worked out. Some Ideas include:

      1) A how-to video. You could do cooking, a workshop or craft project, anything you can show off. My suggestion would be to shoot only video, and add voice-over dialogue in the post

      2) A cartoon. This could be drawn animation, CGI, or make some toys or household stufff (such as clothes) do stop-motion animation.

      3) a dialogue conversation, similar to "My Dinner with Andre." Make sure your conversation is a good short story (i.e. it builds to a climax), and make sure you have lots of interesting camera angles.

      4) Get your funny uncle to tell a joke, and create a presentation around it. Build a story, show reactions of family members, etc. Be creative!

  45. QUESTION:
    Any ideas for a short youtube film?
    Using a cast of two or three people. The best answer will get Credited in the film.

    • ANSWER:
      A cop or cops (good cop and bad cop) interrogating a suspect. You save money on location shooting and sets. Just find a dreary room with a bright light overhead. Depending on what kind of movie you want will determine what the alleged crime is and dialogue.

  46. QUESTION:
    Which book should I pick for my book project?
    I'm in an 11th grade AP English class, and have to write a 2000-5000 word essay on the book. I also have to teach the teacher something that is related to the book. Here are my top choices so far:
    A Clockwork Orange
    Age of Innocence
    Lolita
    The Handmaid's Tail
    Please help me pick one of these and any other suggestions would also be appreciated. Thanks in advance!!

    • ANSWER:
      A Clockwork Orange is one of those books which everyone has heard of but which few people have actually read –- mostly, I think, because it is preceded by a reputation of shocking ultra-violence. I’m not going to deny here that the book contains violence. It features lengthy descriptions of heinous crimes, and they’re vivid descriptions, full of excitement. (Burgess later wrote in his autobiography: ‘I was sickened by my own excitement at setting it down.’) Yet it does not glorify violence, nor is it a book about violence per se. Rather it’s an exploration of the morality of free will. Of whether it is better to choose to be bad than to be conditioned to be good. Of alienation and how to deal with the excesses to which such alienation may lead. And ultimately, of one man’s decision to say goodbye to all that. (At least in the UK version. The American version, on which Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation was based, ends on a less optimistic note.) In short, it’s a novella of ideas which just happens to contain a fair bit of violence.

      It is also quite an artistic and linguistic achievement. Those who have seen the film will know that Alex (the anti-hero) and his droogs (friends) speak a made-up language full of Russian loanwords, Shakespearean and Biblical influences and Cockney rhyming slang. Initially this nadsat language was nearly incomprehensible to me, and my first response to it was bad. I found myself cursing Burgess, telling him that it wasn’t fair to put his readers through something like that. (If I want to read an incomprehensible book, I’ll read Finnegans Wake, thank you very much.) However, Burgess takes great care to introduce his new words in an understandable way, so after a few pages I got the hang of the nadsat lingo, and after a few more pages I actually began to enjoy it, because I’m enough of a linguist to go in for that sort of thing. I found myself loving the Russian loanwords, rejoicing when I recognised a German loanword among them and enjoying the Shakespearean quality of Alex’ dialogues. I finished the book with an urgent wish to learn Russian and read more Shakespeare. I doubt many readers will respond to the book in that way (not everyone shares my enthusiasm for languages and classical stuff), but my point is: you’ll get used to the lingo, and at some point you’ll begin to admire it, because for one thing, Burgess is awfully consistent about it, and for another, it just sounds so damned good. I mean, if you’re going to come up with a new word for ‘crazy’, you might as well choose bezoomny, right? Because it actually sounds mad. Doesn’t it?

      Anyhow, there’s more to A Clockwork Orange than just philosophical ideas and linguistic pyrotechnics. The writing itself is unexpectedly lyrical, and not just when it deals with violence. Some of the most beautiful passages in the book deal with music. More specifically, classical music, because for all his wicked ways, Alex has a passion for classical music. He particularly adores Beethoven, an adoration I happen to share. I came away from the book thinking I might consent to becoming Alex’ devotchka (woman, wife) simply because he is capable of getting carried away by Beethoven’s Ninth and hates having it spoilt for him. He’s cultured, is Alex, and while his culturedness obviously does not equal civilisation and goodness (a point he himself is quick to make), it does put him a notch above the average hooligan. It’s the apparent dichotomy between Alex’ tastes in art and his taste for violence which makes him such an interesting protagonist and which keeps you following his exploits to their not entirely believable (but good) conclusion.

      In short, then, A Clockwork Orange is an excellent book –- a bit challenging at first, but gripping and interesting and full of style and ideas. Not many books can claim as much. It would be a good choice.

  47. QUESTION:
    How do i make a short action movie?
    i just got my HD camera, adobe aftereffects,photoshop, n sony vegas pro 9 and wanna make a awesome movie wit tons of special effects but hav no idea where to start! plz can sumone explain the steps or sumthin, thnx! :)

    • ANSWER:
      first think of two questions
      1. where do you want to shoot.
      2. and how many persons you have to act.
      bcoz this is short movie.

      story:
      then acoording to the location and no of actors create a story just in half paragraph.
      example line: mr x comes home and sleep in sofa.

      script:
      expand this half paragraph with the element like, dialogues, camera angles and thier movement. title the each new start of camera shot as scene 1,2,3......
      example: scene 1: indoor/night
      mr x comes home removing his shoes one by one and placing it in shoe racks, then he enters the room and take the music player remote control from sofa and playing music.meanwhile calling her wife
      mr x: "are you in home"
      then slows down the volume of music in remote control and lies down in sofa.

      involve others:
      explain the story to the actors.

      shoot:
      do the recording as you written in script .dont record the video in any effect, shoot in normal mode. if you want any effects you can add it in editing.

      edit:
      transfer the video to pc, do some editing. title the movie. please reffer the respective software manuals to do it.

      and
      enjoy the film.

      hey send me the clip!

  48. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know what this film term means?
    I was watching a movie with commentary on and one of the actors kept saying that they had to "eighty r" a scene. (no idea how to spell it)
    And it's been making me insane because I can't figure out what the hell it means. I've tried all types of various spellings, eighty-r, 80R, 80-R etc
    Could someone please help me with this??

    • ANSWER:
      ADR :).....automated dialogue replacement

      Automated dialogue replacement (ADR) is the process of re-recording the original dialogue after filming for the purpose of obtaining a cleaner, more intelligible dialogue track (also known as looping or a looping session).

      So in short.....Dubbing :)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubbing_%28filmmaking%29

      Happy to help!

  49. QUESTION:
    who are the people who come with idea for commercials?
    That's something i've always wanted to do.But I don't know where to start working on it i know that probably falls under marketing.But i see Allot of marketing jobs and classes that make you learn like Design with computers.well i guess to make long story short i just wanna work with what is said and what happens in commercials and strategies not making or designing adds.If there any way u could tell me where to go with my goal or what schooling i might need would be very appreciated thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Usually the people that do the designs and direction of a commercial or short film come up with the visual aspects and also play a leading role in the creativity since they have the tools on hand.Screen writers and play-writes also have a lot of input as far as what is said dialogue you know.If you want to freelance maybe you could write out a commercial and take it to some local directors or producers or people at school that want a project.You really would have to do a deep study into commercial advertisements and read the credits and discover just how many people play a significant part. Go to your local college and start asking questions.Maybe you will find exactly what you are looking for.

  50. QUESTION:
    Can u PLEASE help me in developing a new story?
    I write full flesh 2 hour stories but now i got to write a 12 minute animation film and really nothing is coming in my mind, actually i live alone and i think if u give me new thoughts and different different ideas about which i can write my stories.
    I got a nice animation team and other technicians i am making this film for commercial purposes.
    Can u help me in this

    • ANSWER:
      Short animated films are always fun to make. Try to picture this:
      There is a child in a field. He or she has a kite. The wind is blowing very strong and the child is running with the kite. The kite will not fly no matter how hard the child runs with it. The child finally gives up and sits down, huffing and puffing. The kite is sitting on the ground next to the child. All of the sudden the wind stops and it is dead silent. The kite slowly lifts off the ground and is soon up in the air flying as if the wind is blowing, though there is no wind. The child looks up when he notices the kite is gone and sees an angel in the sky, flying around while holding his kite. The child grabs the string to the kite and runs through the field with no wind going and the angel holding his kite. Before he runs out of sight in the end, the angel turns back and winks.

      There is no dialogue throughout this but you can hear the wind blowing and the sound of the angel's wink. There needs to be trees around him so you can see the strength of the wind from the trees blowing.

      I dont know if this is what you were going for, or if the angel thing may be a little too religious, but I thought it conveyed great meaning and made you think. It represents faith and hope.

      Anyways, that was my brilliant idea. Email me if you have any questions or anything: krj098@gmail.com


short film ideas no dialogue