Short Film Scripts For Kids

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How can I film in/fake a courtroom for a student film?
    I'm working on a short film that I need to make as part of my applications to art colleges and my script contains a courtroom scene. The problem is, I have no idea how I can get a hold of a court room. Any ideas on how to either actually do this or fake it? I've considered green screening it, but I'm having trouble finding the right angles I'd need in online photos of courtrooms.

    • ANSWER:
      Go to your local county court and ask them if you can reserve a court room on the weekend, or sometime in the evening. It may cost you a small fee to rent out the room, but usually it is free. I used to do this when I coached my mock trial kids, and never had a problem.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any short film comedy ideas or scripts?
    Me and some guys need to make a short comedic film for a high school film fest. It should be like 5 to 10 minutes. If it could be a high-school related story it would be great. I would give you credit.

    • ANSWER:
      i got one

      Shawn "The Kosher Clemens Express" Clemens was one of the best Jewish ballplayers and one of the best ballplayers of his time w/over 400 wins under his belt. He had 100 perfect games with 27 strikeouts each in his first 2½ seasons. He was in the All-Star game in each of his MLB seasons of his career. He was always the starter in each.

      But after his MLB record 30th season, something happened to his arm. He had already had a record of 1,154 wins, a record zero losses, a record 9,232 innings pitched, no saves as he has always been a starter, and a major record of 31,164 strikeouts (an avg. of 25 strikeouts/9 innings). His arm was badly hurting. He went to the team’s doctor in New York.

      "So, Dr. Johnson, what has exactly happened to my arm?" asked the star pitcher Shawn Clemens.

      "Well, Shawn, I am afraid that you have injured your right elbow," responded Dr. Will Johnson, the team’s New York-based doctor for the Yankees.

      "Do I have any choices?" asked the Kosher Clemens Express.

      "Yeah, you can have Tommy John surgery and sit out this upcoming season. You can have Tommy John surgery and end your career immediately. Or you can choose not to have surgery and jeopardize our career. Do me a favor?" said the doctor.

      "What is that favor?" Shawn asked.

      "What ever your choice is, just do kvetch about anything," Will told him.

      "I think tight I have decided not to pitch next season by having Tommy John surgery this year, and you have my word. I will not kvetch," said Clemens.

      "Great, come back tomorrow at 9:00 AM in the morning," replied Johnson.

      "Okay, sounds great," Shawn said. He then left with his wife of 28 years, and a beautiful mother of three kids (Nathan Scott, 20 Rebecca Leah, 15 Jonathan Richard, 10).

      One season later, he had started a new season after he completely recovered from Tommy John surgery. He threw harder than he ever did before. He fastball was timed at 110 mph. He had to refrain from the curve as those had hurt him to throw them.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are good outlines for a zombie script?
    I'm writing a complete script for a short high school zombie film. Basically, on, paper, it will look like a play. I need the cast, crew, plot, etc. Here is where I need you.

    I need you to tell me what I need for my complete script, and in what order, so basically, guidelines for my script. Thank you so much.

    • ANSWER:
      I can give you some thing from a story that i have been writing just like add a few other things

      This is called the way the world ends:when zombies attack.

      The end was always near but none of us suspected it…Till Now!
      The day started out differently than normal because I woke up at 5 o’clock in the morning. After that I was very hungry, which is very rare for me. Well anyway, the end all started when I went to school our buses blew up when we were in second period. Then a moaning man with grey skin broke down the door. “ZOMBIES” one kid screamed. Our teacher risked their life to save ours sadly that risk was not worth taking. They died as soon as they got close to the zombie because of a bight mark on their arm. When me and 3 more survivors escaped from school we went to a gun store and grabbed some snipers and shot guns we ran to a Wal-Mart.

      P.s it is not done

  4. QUESTION:
    How do I start a career in film-making?
    I have knowledge but no experience in film direction, screenwriting. I have a sound knowledge in editing and cinematography but have nothing to show on my resume. Any one can please help me what should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Get together with someone who has a short script, get one of the hundreds of hand held cameras that have video capability and some video editing software and "Hey, kids, lets make a movie." Make short films that you can use as examples or enter in film making competitions.

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you turn a novel story into an animated film?
    My name is Daydrian Lewis. I am 21 years old.
    I'm an artist, a writer and a painter.

    I've decided to ask this question because I am very interested in writing and directing my own story and transforming it into an 2D animated film someday. I grew up liking the Western and Japanese styles of animation. Mainly the Japanese. Due to the fact that they have more of a freedom to their animating style.

    Turning a story into an animated film is my long term goal that I must achieve. Besides the novel itself,. I've written the script as well to go with it. Along with the many other concept arts I drew for my characters, places and objects. From what I noticed. Most of the animated films nowadays, are filled with horrible storytelling. Usually, the typical 3D animated films with the repetitive plots. It's been awhile since the last time we've seen a good 2D animated film by Disney or anyone else (Not including the Studio Ghibli ones). This gave me a huge opportunity to show off a new colorful 2D animated film with a well-praised plot, great characters, and gorgeous music. Yes, this seems like a "Hah! Dream on, kid!" or a "Not gonna happen, man."

    Hell, that's not going to stop me.

    What I really want to know is... What are the major steps to reaching that goal? How do you contact a animation studio to take the time to view your story novel/script?

    If J.K Rowling can make it big. Then so can I. Life is too short to give up on those goals. I know I can reach for that same goal too. If you guys can leave me tips or suggestions. I would appreciate it.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Nice to see you're so determined, good luck.

      If you're so sure about your success, you can take an independant route. If you can finance the entire production from your pocket, then it's a piece of cake.

      Getting attention and financial support from major studios is going to be difficult, well I guess you can just contact them with business proposition (it has to look professional) or participate in contests and hope to get noticed.

  6. QUESTION:
    How to become an actress as a kid?
    I am pursuing my dream in becoming a kid actress. I am actually a tween. (My mom's yahoo account.)
    I sometimes model. I have an instagram with almost 10,000 followers. But I want to be an actress. How can I become one? Do I need an agent? What do I have to do?

    • ANSWER:
      The steps to being an actor are the steps you take.
      Acting is usually one of three things: a Hobby, a Lifestyle and a Career.
      Already because of the three different meanings there are three different paths.
      In short, no path is the same and what worked for one person mightn't work for someone else.

      Anyone can pick Acting up as a Hobby.
      Whether it be picking up a script, grabbing yourself a camera, acting it out, filming it then uploading it to Youtube. Or seeing an audition notice in a local newspaper for an upcoming play, contacting the director, attending the audition and seeing how it goes.

      As a Lifestyle, you've decided that Acting means something more to you long term.
      Therefor it may be in your best interest to get involved with Acting Classes, Acting Schools, become a Member of a Theatre Company to generate more regular Acting Opportunities. Though how you enjoy Acting as part of your Lifestyle is up to you, same as enjoying Exercise as part of your Lifestyle.

      The website Starnow:
      http://www.starnow.com/curtisfarrell
      Provides opportunities for Actors interested in both of the above and occasional professional opportunities as well.
      For Actors in Australia I recommend against AT2 as it's very similar to Starnow - you get the same types of opportunities, though you have to pay over 0 more per year for them and they discriminate between Actors who do have an Agent and those who don't.

      If you're after Acting as a Career there are certain things inside of your control and outside of your control.
      What's inside of your control is keeping yourself ready, centered and focused - (this is usually done by keeping yourself busy with some acting opportunity whether it's paid or not). Having an Agent, representation, networking and looking for work.
      What's inside of your control are the avenues you have to generate work, what's outside of your control is the work that comes in.
      Lucky breaks are also outside of your control. You can do your best to be in the right place at the right time, though sometimes it's not a matter of what you know but who you know.

      When you're ready to take a step towards a Career, here's how to Find and Apply for an Agent:
      http://www.youtube.com/user/Funstuff13613?feature=mhee#p/u/4/0nUBPVIwJTE
      It's how I got mine.

      Answers that give you a bulk ladder in how to become an actor are false.
      As anyone can become an Actor just as anyone can become a cook.
      Acting isn't the same as being famous and Acting means many different things to many different people.

      The best step for you to take, is the step that is available to you.
      Once you take that step I'm sure you will gain insight as to what you'd like to pursue and what step you'd like to take next.

      All the best :)

  7. QUESTION:
    How to let my parents go on acting auditions?
    Performing is my life. I love singing and acting so much it's literally all I can see myself doing. I've wanted to be an actress since I was a little kid. I've done classes and worksops and school plays but I want to go on real auditions. I really want to do this. I want to ask my parents about starting up an acting career. I feel like I'm running out of tine. I'm 15 btw. How can I ask them and get them to agree with me? This is really what I want. I feel like they'll just laugh at me and say no.

    • ANSWER:
      First, you're not running out of time. You don't have to have a professional career as a child to have a professional career as an adult. One thing you have to understand is that a professional career doesn't happen over night. You have to be in it for the long haul. Your parents have paid for classes and workshops and helped you get to and from rehersals to school plays, so they are supporting you. If you really do want to have a career, you're going to have to learn how to talk to people. So talk to your parents about what your goals are. (Not just what you want - but ways you think you can get it.)

      So maybe start looking at community theaters in your area to see what they have coming up that you could audition for. You or your parents could contact any local film schools/programs and ask them how they get actors for their student films. Check out the website for your local film commission and see what's happening in your area. Those might present some opportunties for you for "real" auditions.

      You'll also need to keep building your skills (which shouldn't be tough for you to do since you love performing). So continue with acting classes. Voice classes and dance lessons can be fun too. Join a choir, dance troupe or other performance group. Check into if there are any speech/drama clubs (or maybe starting one) so you could compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions. Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor. Play improv games with your friends, create your own home movies, put on your own productions. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      But if you're thinking about more professional work, you need to understand that professional acting is a business. You're not going to be able to show up at some open audition and be "discovered" - that's not how the industry works. Companies invest a lot of money in their productions and they trust that investment to trained and experienced professionals, so auditions are arranged through a talent agent and there usually aren't open auditions. Even for some of the other things I mentioned like student films, there may not be open auditions. You may just send in your head shot and an acting resume to the director/casting director and then they contact you if they're interested in having you come in for an audition.

      Talent agents are paid on commission - they receive a percentage of what their clients make. (Never pay an agent up front.) Since they are paid only if their clients are paid, they are picky about who they take on as clients. And they can be picky because there are a lot more people wanting to be actors than there are parts. And so you (or your parents) have to know what professional work is available in your area and whether it even makes sense for you to have an agent at this point.

      It could be helpful if you have a good idea of just what you're asking your parents to do in order for you to have a professional career at your age. They'll need to do the research to understand the entire casting process, who the players are, how it all fits together, what professional work is actually available for you in the area. Depending on where you live and what you're hoping for - they'll have to understand acting unions, industry contracts (GSA vs SAG), and things like that. You may need an entertainment work permit and a trust account established in your name. Networking and having conacts in the industry is how you find out about opportunties, so they'd have to do that. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there, so your parents are going to have to do a lot of research to understand the business end of things so no one takes advantage of you. It's a lot more than just taking you to and from some "real" auditions.

      There's a website run by a non-profit group for families in the enteratinment industry. You and your parents might want to look it over (they have a whole "getting started" section and the like):

      http://www.bizparentz.org/

      This website also has some helpful articles about the acting industry and kids:

      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/

      Good luck.

  8. QUESTION:
    what will be the duration of a film whose story is 46 pages?
    well i have written a story of total 46pages & i have a meeting with a film producer. Can you tell me what will be the duration of 46pages of story?

    • ANSWER:
      As other people have been saying, length of a film has nothing to do with the number of pages of a story. Look at The Lottery, as someone already said, or a more popular example would be Shrek or Where the Wild Things Are. Both of those were based on kids books, were full length movies based on short books.

      Really what the length of the film has to do with is the length of the script, which is different from the story.

      The reason that the number of pages really has nothing to do with it is that think about it this way:
      If one of your 46 pages is mostly dialogue, then in a movie this may take 1 minute, or it may take 5 minutes.

      However, if one of your pages has a lot of action as well as dialogue, it could take twice the amount of time as a page with more dialogue than action.

      So, it all boils down to this: Imagine your story as a script.

      Another thing that you can do is have in mind a certain amount of time, say, 1.5 hours, and write a script that will fill up that much time.

      Hope this helped,

      Konstantin

  9. QUESTION:
    How can I start my acting career?
    Well, to cut the long story short I Love Acting. So, I want to start acting professionally. My mom has enrolled me to an performing arts school(acting, dancing and singing) that I will be starting very soon. I really just asked this question to find out what: should go on my resume, how to get an agent and are there any other things I can do to help build my career?

    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      A performing arts school should be a helpful thing for you. Focus on having fun learning and growing as an actor and build a local reputation as a strong, talented and mature actor. Some things you can do. In addition to the acting, voice and dance lessons you can:

      * Audition for what you can - school plays, community theater, student films, local productions.
      * Perform with choir or dance troupe or other performance group.
      * Read plays and scripts - all kinds - and keep an eye out for characters and monologues you love and want to develop.
      * Read books and websites about acting - the craft/technique and the business end of things too.
      * Join Speech/Drama club and look into competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions.
      * Contact local film schools and ask how they find actors for student films and check those resources. It's a bit of a long shot since generally they're looking for older people, but you can try.
      * Keep up your grades in school. Embrace learning, you never know when you can somehow use that information later.

      While you do that, your parents can research the to research and understand the business end of acting. You need to understand that you're not going to get "discovered" or anything like that. That's not how the industry really works. Professional acting is a business and there are a lot of scams/ripoffs out there. Since you're a minor, your parents will have to be the CEO of any professional acting career you attempt. They will need to understand the industry enough to make sure no one takes advantage of you. They'll need to understand the entire casting process, who the players are, what they do (and don't do). They'll need to be familiar with industry contracts, acting unions, legal requirements for minors in the industry. They will have to make connections and network with local people in the industry. Networking is how actors find out about opportunities. Some helpful websites for you and your parents:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

      Your acting training, experience and special skills go on your resume. Never lie on your resume. You (or your parents) can do an internet search to find examples for you to follow.

      You get an agent by convincing one that you have the talent, training, experience and commitment to book professional jobs. Agents are paid on commission (never pay an agent up front). Since they're paid only if their clients are paid, they are picky about who they take on as clients. So again, networking is the best way to get an agent. Talk with your acting teachers/coaches, directors you've worked with and the like. Let people know you're thinking about getting an agent and if you've impressed someone with your skills, they may be willing to refer you to an agent.

      If your acting school has a good reputation, it's possible they may attract agents and casting directors to showcases. So you might be able to get interest in you that way.

      Another option is to research and make a list of of local talent agents (that you've verified are legitimate) and check into how to submit to them. Usually they want you to mail in your head shot and acting resume. If they're interested in you, they'll contact you. If you don't hear anything back, then they're not interested at this point. Some places that list legitimate agents:

      http://www.sagaftra.org/agency-relations/sag-franchised-agents
      http://www.sagaftra.org/agency-relations/aftra-franchised-agents
      http://www.backstage.com/resources/search/agent/

      Good luck.

  10. QUESTION:
    What are talent acting agents looking for in a resume?
    ok,im 15 years old and i live in NYC and i would like to know exactly what talent agencies are looking for in teen resumes. i know some people would say student films but i really dont trust them that much so is there anything else that they are intersted. also, are all the non-union auditions found in the backstage magazine reputable?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi - at 15 you're going to be competing with adult actors, not kids, so you're going to need an adult resume. And there's nothing wrong with student films, as long as you're selective. Choose ones being done by college students or graduates, check the script and don't do it if it's poorly written or has a stupid plot. Many good actors have started off in student films - they often get shown at festivals and competitions and are seen by some very influential people!

      But you should start by building up a resume which included -
      Your contact details and personal information, such as playing age, height, weight or build, hair length and colour.
      The name of the drama school you attended, how long the course was, and when you graduated.
      The details of extra courses you've attended, such as stage combat, accent and voice training, dance grades, singing grades, mime, mask, etc.
      What accents you can do convincingly, what languages you speak.
      A list of stage plays you've performed in, in public, and they should include all types of play - Shakespeare, Greek tragedy, comedy, drama, farce, musicals, period drama, etc. naming where they were performed, and the director's name.
      A list of short films, student films, naming the directors.
      A list of other experience, such as commercials, educational tours, promotional work.

      You will also need a good selection of professionally made headshots.
      A professionally made showreel and voicereel.
      Ideally, your own website, with all the above displayed and with links to your membership of professional organisations.
      I think that's about it.
      Hope that helps.

      Most genuine auditions are only found through agents, and agents won't be interested in you until you have had professional training and loads of experience. Most open calls are just scams or publicity stunts.
      Good luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    what websites can i find scripts from movies?
    im going to audition for disney channel and i need some practice so what websites can i print out scripts from movies? i need sources please?

    • ANSWER:
      Everyone else has already given you the links that I would have given you, but I want to warn you that if you don't have an agent chances are you are not actually auditioning for Disney. If you were approached in the mall or you saw an ad and called to audition, it's not real and you shouldn't bother going. There are companies out there who prey on people who want to get into the entertainment busines so they put up eye catching commercials or make promises on radio ads to get you to call. They also have 'talent scouts' they send to local malls to approach kids and their moms who tell you that you have a great look) or whatever and you must have great luck because they happen to be having auditions this weekend!

      This sounds like a common scam. A company who really sells high priced classes advertises auditions for a Disney show but in the end they give you the hard sell on their classes for somewhere between 0 - 00.
      They have you audition by reading a short scene or commercial often from a well known product or even a Disney show. These pages are very easy to obtain or type up yourself... watch the show, copy the dialogue. That's all there is to it. They film you on camera and have you go to the next person who will either tell you that you have potential but you need to take their classes or tell you someone will call you if they're interested (and they'll always call because they want your money). I've heard that they put on the hard sell, meaning that often they try to pressure you into paying for several months of these classes by saying that they are only offering this opportunity to so many kids and you're really lucky to be getting this deal, and it's only available NOW, blah blah blah... If they're so reputable then why do they need you to pay NOW? Because they just care about getting your money. They prey on kids and parents with stars in their eyes... please don't fall for it. Don't give them any money.

      Also you should know that REPUTABLE agents get 10% of your pay AFTER they help you get a job, no more than that and not a cent up front.

      Good luck

  12. QUESTION:
    How can I get into acting in North Carolina?
    Can somebody please tell me how to get into acting. I live in Southern Pines, North Carolina. The Theatre at my Highschool is a joke all they do is play around we never do anything serious or go on trips etc kids just take it because you don't have to do work there. There is no Theatre where I live the closets one is like 2 hours away. I don't have any money to pay to go to an acting school or take classes, and plus they don't have them where I live. Does anyone know how to find a acting agent? All the talent agencies I've found were SCAMS. I don't have a resume. There aren't any agencies near me. I don't know how to find a casting agency. Can someone please help me I really want to be an actor but just don't know how.

    • ANSWER:
      Professional acting is a business and agents are paid on commission. Since they are paid only if their clients are paid, they are picky about who they take on as clients. And they can be picky because there are a lot more people wanting to be actors than there are jobs. Since actors only get paid if they can book professional jobs, they need to be available for auditions on short notice. That's why agents look for local clients who can go to local auditions. If there isn't the work in your area, then it really doesn't make sense to get a talent agent at this point in time. Living in North Carolina with no training or experience, you're not going to be able to get an agent in LA or something like that. I know that's disappointing, but that's the way things are for you right now.

      So if you're really serious about acting you need to start to look for what opportunties you do have in your area and make your own opportunties if you can. If there are no acting classes, see if you can find any recommendations for an acting coach in the area that might be willing to give private lessons and save up your money to pay for those. Start saving money for a summer acting camp or look into scholarships available for acting summer camps. If there's a film school or program near you, you could contact them and see how they find actors for student films and check those resources. Look at the websites for your area's film commission and see what opportunties are there.

      If you don't want to perform in school shows and you say there's no theater to perform with where you live, then maybe look into choir or dance programs and try performing with those. Look into other peforming groups. Look into how you could compete in the acting categories of speech/drama forensic competitions. Maybe you could even start a club at school that competes. See if you can find some people who enjoy acting like you do and get to gether to work on improv and do improv shows if you can. Make your own movies or webseries or put on your own productions.

      Read books about acting - the acting techniques and the business end of acting. Read plays and scripts, keeping an eye out for characters and monologues you want to learn and develop. Read other things too - novels, short stories, poetry. Understanding language and storytelling will help you as an actor.

      There's a reason why they use the phrase "struggling actor" because sometimes it's a struggle to be an actor. It's a myth to think that people are just "discovered". No one is going to give you an acting career, so if you want want it's something that you're going to have to work with. You can check into acting schools/programs for after high school. It's not required for a professional career, but they can be helpful. Not only do you improve your skills, but they're a good way to start to make contacts in the industry. Networking is very important to an acting career.

      Good luck.

  13. QUESTION:
    What are some good summer bucket list ideas?
    Crazy ideas, like rebellious things. I'm doing it with a few friends and we need a lot of crazy ideas to add to our lists! (We are all 15 and 16 so don't make it like little kid stuff, please!)

    • ANSWER:
      1. Go for a walk/run/jog in the woods/park.
      2. Get some chalk. Play hopscotch and draw.
      3. Read a good book in a hammock.
      4. Go on a nature hike.
      5. Play some tennis/basketball/badminton.
      6. Go to a farmers’ market. Buy at least one weird thing you’ve never eaten before.
      7. Have a water balloon toss or fight. Whichever you prefer.
      8. Go to a yoga class.
      9. Go on a bike ride.
      10. Make a nature photo collage.
      11. See how many laps you can swim in a row. Keep practicing. Then see how many you can do by the end of the summer.
      12. Look at stars one night.
      13. Play Bingo with the old folks (never admit it when you won, or give winnings to the person sitting beside you. It’s not nice to take from the old people)
      14. Write a novel/short story. Base it on true events or just completely make it up. You can even write about things that you wish would happen in your life.
      15. Convince a random person that you’re their long-lost third cousin.
      16. Write messages on note cards. Stick the note cards in balloons and blow them up. Hang the balloons on friends/neighbors porches. When they pop the balloon they read the secret message
      17 Pick wild flowers and then play ding-dong-ditch, leaving the bouquets on people’s doorsteps. It will brighten their day (or leave ones with bugs in them on people’s doorsteps that you don’t like.
      18. Take dog for walk and runs.
      19. Have a Nerf gunfight.
      20. Have a picnic.
      21. Have an overnight movie marathon.
      22. Buy and use and develop an underwater camera.
      23. Sketch a flower.
      24. Bury a friend in the sand.
      25. Go fishing.
      26. Sleep in your backyard.
      27. Create a photo journal.
      28. Write a play.
      29. Make green eggs and ham.
      30. Sketch your pet.
      31. Have a high tea, only use iced-teas.
      32. Watch the sunrise.
      33. Watch the sunset.
      34. Make a collage out of old magazines.
      35. Swing.
      36. Skip stones at a lake.
      37. Give your dog/pet a bath outside.
      38. Leave notes in library books for the next person to find.
      39. Run through a sprinkler.
      40. Sleep until noon – once.
      41. Tie-dye your bed sheets.
      42. See some fireworks.
      43. See a professional baseball game. Cough cough Cubs.
      44. Play mini-golf.
      45.Get together with some friends and make a movie. Don’t forget to write a script, make costumes and pick the best location.
      46. Leave initials (and possibly hand print) in wet concrete.
      47. Go to the zoo.
      48. Spend an entire day in a grocery store
      49. Play Tag In The Rain.
      50. Get Bikes.
      51. Bike five miles.
      52. Go to the YMCA.
      53. Write a complaint/satisfaction letter, just to get free stuff.
      54. Go to Quincy.
      55. Fill up a whole coloring book.
      56. Destroy a watermelon.
      57. Hang out with friends.
      58. Learn a new hobby.
      59. READ books.
      60. Go to the library.
      61. Stand in 2 different states at once.
      62. Go to build-a-bear.
      63. Stay outside for 12 hours straight.
      64. Legitimate photo shoot.
      65. Celebrate a foreign holiday the way the natives do.
      66. Get a tan tattoo.
      67. Convince someone you’re from a foreign country.
      68. Wake up every morning before 9:00 a.m.
      69. Water fight. Including but not limited to: balloons, guns, hoses, and buckets.
      70. Superglue a quarter to the ground.
      71. Bake Dog Treats.
      72. Go 24 hours without food.
      73. Write a note on a stranger’s windshield with dry-erase marker.
      74. enter a photo contest.
      75. Buy a goldfish.
      76. Answer phones like buddy the elf.
      77. Bake a batch of really cute cupcakes.
      78. Go a whole week without technology.
      79. Watch a meteor shower (Aug. 13).
      80. Write a letter to the editor.
      81. Pick an official summer song.
      82. Go To An Outdoor Concert.
      83. Mow the Lawn.
      84. Plant something edible.
      85. Spend one whole day barefoot.
      86. Help an old lady cross the street.
      87. Create something made out of duct tape.
      88. Play tennis in the rain.
      89. Sleep in a car for a night.
      90. Go To A Fair.
      91. Watch a foreign film.
      92. Have everyone you meet for a day sign your shirt.
      93. Jump into a pool fully clothed.
      94. Carve your name into a tree.
      95. Stretch every day
      96. Go to an “Open Late” restaurant past midnight
      97. Continue into my journey of photography. Yes, this means experiment on Molly and nature, anything and everything.
      98. Buy Ice Cream From The Ice Cream Truck.
      99. Go to a midnight movie premiere
      100. Go a whole week without technology.
      101. Go 48 hours without shoes on.
      102. Face Paint.
      103. Go to an aquarium
      104. Eat Kabobs.
      105. Learn 10 new words. And actually use them.
      106. Go movie hopping.
      107. Cover a car in sticky notes.
      108. Build and start a campfire.
      109. Go Flower-Picking.
      110. Have a Disney movie marathon.
      111. No facebook for two weeks.
      112. Have A Spa Day.
      113. Make a time capsule to open after college graduation.
      114. Finger paint a picture and then frame it.
      115. Say ‘yes’ to everything for one day.
      116. Carve a watermelon.
      There are more on the website down below
      Happy summer
      Alicia

  14. QUESTION:
    What are some VERY general estimates of film costs?
    I have to do a movie project for a high school class and it requires a budget breakdown. I was wondering if anyone knew how much a crew costs, how much cgi costs, and how much studio space costs (you can base estimates on other movies).
    General estimates are more than sufficient.
    Also, please, if you provide an answer can you site your source or at least your name so I can give you credit? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      your question is impossible to answer because the real answer is "it depends." let me see if I can break it down for you a bit:
      to make a movie you probably need:
      a director
      a cinematographer (guy in charge of lighting)
      a sound guy (guy in charge of recording sound)
      a writer
      two actors (or more)
      an editor
      when I did school projects they all got paid zip.

      but if you were to pay them, it would probably be based on number of days they worked. how do you estimate that? depends on your script length. a page of standard formatted script runs at one minute for each page. So a 2 hour movie is about 120 pages long. how long is yours?
      a crew can be as complicated as hair/make-up, wardrobe, props, grip, best boy, script girl, etc., etc. etc... or if you did them like we did, everybody held multiple jobs.
      plus, a camera
      some film....
      what you need is to find a production budget spreadsheet. or read Robert Rodriguez book on filmmaking.
      are you shooting film? or digital. Film requires you to process the film and transfer it so you can edit it. Digital saves you money. you can look at what you shot right away and import it into your computer to edit.
      Digital is also more forgiving - meaning you won't have to rent or borrow lights to see what's going on in the scene. you can use "available light" to shoot your scenes.
      you also need to consider paying for rental of locations, costumes, props and stuff like that. and food for the cast and crew. again, if you use the rodriguez method, he created a script using stuff he already had access to and people who were already interested in doing it for free.and they made spaghetti to feed everybody.
      cgi? that's crazy talk unless you know somebody who can do that as a favor. other things you'll have to consider after the shoot is paying for music, sound effects, color correction, dubs, titles... and the list goes on. check out web sites like filmmaker.com to look for answers to your questions.
      I'd suggest you find someone who owns a digital camera and make him/her the director. find someone who has an editing program on their computer and make him/her the editor. then get together with some friends who want to "star" in a short film and brainstorm simple story ideas. It could be story as simple as wimpy guy trying to make it through the day without the neighborhood bully catching him, or a poor girl trying to raise money to buy a new swim suit for a cool pool party, or a kid who's afraid of the dark trying to make it through the night when his parent left town.
      George Washington by David Gordon Green; Straight Out of Brooklyn and Mariachi are three films made by guys who did a lot with very little.
      If you do this right, you should only have to pay for digital film tape and some DVDs to burn. You shouldn't try to be "professional" and budget studio space or hire actors. since you're learning the biz, do it with others who have a desire to try something without pay.
      as a student, you should spend more time worrying about telling a story that people want to watch than going for a high budget "studio" effects.

      in film school I made a 5 minute movie about a women who was driving around the neighborhood on her way to get her new dog. the trick was, she was really stalking the neighborhood and when she found the perfect dog, she jumped out of the car, grabbed it and took off. it was a shocker ending that film festivals loved. simple idea - One actor, one car, one director, one camera guy. one editor. one dog.
      everything starts with the script. do you have one?
      hope this helps.
      what you're doing right is asking questions. keep doing that. it's the only way you'll learn what you don't know.
      good luck.

  15. QUESTION:
    Movie auditions for kids in or near Plymouth county Massachusetts?
    I am 14 years old and I think I'm really good at acting. I'd like to land a role in a commercial or music video or something of the sort. Any sugessgions?

    • ANSWER:
      I suggest you talk to your parents. Wanting professional roles like in a commercial or a music video means that your parents HAVE to be involved. It's not as easy as just showing up at some audition. Professional acting is a business. Most roles in commercials are cast through talent agents not open auditions. Plus to work in the entertainment industry as a minor you may need an enteratinment work permit (http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/childentertain2011.htm#Massachusetts ). And since there are restrictions on when minors can work and requirements like having to have a parent or guardian on set with you at all times, often companies will hire adults to play teen roles.

      But if you're interested in acting, you can focus on building a reputation as a talented, mature actor where you are. Look into acting classes. It's good to have dance lessons, maybe check into voice lessons too. Audition for what you can - school plays, community theater and the like. Perform with choirs, dance troupes, or other performing groups,. Read a ton of plays and scripts, keeping an eye out for monologues and characters you love and want to develop. Maybe perform those for your parents and friends. Read other things too (novels, poems, short stories). Understanding language and storytelling will help you with your acting. Look into speech/drama clubs and competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions. Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunities are there. Get together with friends and play improv games, make your own home movies or web series or put on your own show. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      If you're serious about wanting to work more professionally, then talk with your parents. They're going to have to do a lot of research to understand the business end of things. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there, so they need to know how things work to make sure people don't take advantage of you. A helpful websites:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/

  16. QUESTION:
    How long should a feature screenplay be?
    I have heard the classic 90-120.
    But then stuff like not over 95 or 105 for new writer.
    Thank you for your time.

    • ANSWER:
      Yup, 90-120 is the general guideline. Big names like James Cameron or Mike Leigh get away with far more, and others like Sophia Ford Coppola a lot less (44 pages for her last film!) - that's because those with the money already KNOW they can sell and get bums on cinema seats.

      When you're a newbie you're asking those with the money to take a gamble on your script - to risk thousands, maybe millions, on making your movie. You have to abide by the rules. And 90-120 pages is the rules.

      HOWEVER, 90 is pretty short for say a historical drama, and 120 is pretty long for a horror or a screwball comedy or a kids' film, so genre comes into it too; look at other films in your genre and see how long they are. If genre doesn't dictate a range to you, your safest bet is to aim for somewhere in the middle; somewhere between 100-110. But this isn't a hard and fast rule.

      Another thing to bear in mind is that the average script reader - the one who reads the scripts first and only passes the best ones on to the producer - has a lot to read in a day and tends to read the shorter scripts first and push the longer ones to the bottom of the pile. So it may be in your interests to stay on the shorter side of the range - as long as it suits your genre.

      Confusing, huh? Like I say, none of these are hard and fast rules (except you'd be very lucky to get a script over 120 read) - so my advice is examine your genre carefully, decide on a range, and aim for the bottom end of it.

      Hope this helps. Good luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    What are the best colleges for screenwriting in the United States?
    I want to be a screenwriter and was wondering what the best colleges for that are.

    • ANSWER:
      UCLA, USC and NYU Tisch. Besides being excellent schools, they have lots of connections in the entertainment industry.

      Others would be Chapman University (Orange, CA), Loyola Marymount and Boston University. There are also screenwriting programs at Florida State U, North Carolina School of Arts, University of Miami, University of Texas and elsewhere.

      If you can't get into any of those schools, there are many more opportunities out there. The most important thing is to find a program that works for you, that teaches in the best way for you. There are even good classes through community colleges.

      And there are screenwriting schools out there -- like Writer's Boot Camp in Santa Monica, CA. They have a discussion rather than lecture style of teaching, which works well for a lot of writers.

      In the meantime, I hope you're writing. Don't wait, there are lots of kids out there that are writing scripts from elementary school on. Go to a bookstore and browse through the screenwriting books to see which ones *talk to you*. Here is a start -

      Screenwriting for Teens: The 100 Principles of Screenwriting Every Budding Writer Must Know by Christina Hamlett - Good for teens, and adults.

      Filmmaking for Teens: Pulling Off Your Shorts by Troy Lanier and Clay Nichols - Best to understand how films are made to help your screenwriting.

      The 101 Habits Of Highly Successful Screenwriters: Insider's Secrets from Hollywood's Top Writers by Karl Iglesias - Inspirational!

      Writing Screenplays That Sell by Michael Hauge - A great book to start with.

      The Screenwriter's Bible: A Complete Guide to Writing, Formatting, and Selling Your Script by David Trottier - Another really good guide.

      Save The Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need by Blake Snyder - Very entertaining and instructional.

      Classics you're going to have to read -

      Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting by Syd Field

      Lew Hunter's Screenwriting 434

      Story: Substance, Structure, Style and The Principles of Screenwriting by Robert McKee

      The Writers Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers by Christopher Vogler

      Good luck!

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the first steps i need to take to become an actress?
    Hey guys! I'm really interested in acting! i've done stage acting(nothing big) and i love it but i really feel I would love commercial,movies,and shows more! I've been really into this for a couple years and its my dream and I've stopped all of my sports and things because I've decided I want to do this. I live in the Orlando area in florida and I would really apprectiate any help! Im 15 and have my parents on board! What are the first steps i need to take?
    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Well, if you're wanting a professional career as a minor, your first step is to talk to your parents about it. Professional acting is a business and having a professional acting career is like starting a company and YOU are the product. Your parents are going to have to a lot more than just drive you to auditions and write a check. They have to be willing to be the CEO of your career. They will have to do a lot of research to make sure they understand the business end of the industry - the whole casting process, who the players are, just what professional work is available in your area. The need to understand actor unions and when/if you should join. They need to have an understanding of the various industry contracts. They will have to have an idea of the best way to market you and your skills to talent agents and managers. They will have to network in the industry to find out about opportunties for you. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there too - so they'll have to know enough to make sure people don't take advantage of them and you.

      Here's a websites for families in the entertainment industry that contains some information you and your parents might find helpful:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/

      You can contine auditioning for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, local productions and the like. You or your parents can try contacting area film schools/programs and see how they find actors for student films. Check out the websites for your local film commission and see what opportunties are there. Acting classes are important - if you want to work professionally, you need to develop your skills. You can also look into voice and dance classes too. Check into speech/drama club and competing in the acting categories of speech/drama forensic competitions. Read plays and scripts, keeping an eye out for characters and monologues you love and want to develop. Read other things too - novels, short stories, poems, understanding language and story telling will help you as an actor. Form an improv group with friends, create your own movie or webseries, put on your own productions. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      Then when both you and your parents are ready, you can look into getting a talent agent. Now you can't just go out and hire an agent, you can't just call them up and ask for an audition. Agents are paid a percentage of what their clients make (never pay an agent up front). Since they are paid only if their clients are paid, they can be picky about who they take on as clients. And they can be picky because there are alot more people wanting to be actors than there are parts. Agents want need to make money - so they're not interseted in your future potential but whether or not you can book jobs now. You're going to have to convince an agent that you have the talent, training, experience and dedication to work professionally. For example, one way to get an agent is to submit your head shot and acting resume to them. If they like what they see, they may contact you for an interview/audition. If you don't hear back, they're not interested in you at this time.

      Some other websites that you should look over that have some helpful information:

      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/

  19. QUESTION:
    How to become an actress in Nebraska?
    I really want to move to LA and start being an actress when I grow up. But for now, I'm stuck in Lincoln, NE. Please help me on how to get started!
    @Alec: I see what you did there. What about an agent?

    • ANSWER:
      You "bloom where you are planted". You build a great reputation as a talented and mature actress in Lincoln NE.

      Start with acting classes. Voice and dance lessons can be fun too. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, local productions. You can peform with a choir, dance troupe or other performance group. Look into speech/drama clubs and competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions. Contact local film schools/programs and ask how they find actors for student films and check those resources regularly. Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunties are there. Read plays and scripts of all different types and keep an eye out for characters and monologues you love. Read other things as well, novels, short stories, poetry. Understanding language and storytelling can help you with theater. Volunteer at theaters and film festivals and get to know people in the industry around where you live. (If you impress them with your work, they may let you know about other opportunties.) Get together with friends a play improv games, make your own movies or webseries, put on your own productions. Have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      And if you're serious about a professional career - you (or your parents) need to start to research the business end of acting as well. Expecting to move to LA, find an agent and get a big career is like buying a lottery ticket and expecting to win a million dollars. It happens only rarely and it's nothing you should bank on. But understanding the industry can increase your chances of success (and help you make sure you really want to pursue a professional acting career.) Here are some websites about children in the entertainment industry that you might want to look over:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

      There's also the book "Self Management for Actors" by Bonnie Gillispee. Professional acting is a business - people are in it to make money, not make your dreams come true. No one is going to give you an acting career - you're going to have to do the work to get it yourself. You'll need to undertand industry contracts, acting unions, the casting process, legal issues like how to do taxes, how to build a network of contacts, how to market yourself to talent agents and managers. There's a lot of stuff to an acting career besides showing up at some audition. Plus most professional actors don't support themselves by acting alone - they have other jobs to have an income. Professional acting is extremely competitive (there are over 100,000 professional actors in LA, there just isn't enough work for everyone). Plus every job you get is temporary, so you always have to be worried abuot when (and if) you'll get another job. So if you go to LA - make sure you have a way to support yourself while you're there.

      You can look into acting schools/programs for after high school. It's not required for a professional career, but a good quality school with well-respected instructors can be very helpful in building your skills and as a way to start to make contacts in the industry.

      As for an agent - that depends on what professional work is actually available in your area. Talk to your acting instructors, directors you work with and other actors to find out what professional work is actually available in your area to see if it's worth getting a talent agent or not. Check out the websites I mentioned above so you can be informed enough not to fall for one of the many scams/ripoffs that are out there. At this pont, you might not need an agent - you can have more fun and you'll get more experience doing the things I mentioned earlier.

      Good luck!

  20. QUESTION:
    How to stop myself from getting distracted?
    I'm writing this story, but I keep getting distracted. Every time I sit down and start writing, I end up watching YouTube videos and Cracked articles. All these distractions make writing seem kind of boring. I love to write and create my own universes and stuff on paper, but whenever I try to write my mind just kinda goes "Nope". How do I stop myself from getting distracted?

    • ANSWER:
      Your kidding yourself if you say you love to write.
      Because if you love to write you don't get distracted by watching videos.

      Maybe consider taking up amateur film making to give your creative juices something to work on?
      How? Write a short script, no dialogue and use a camcorder. View it with friends and family. Then search this topic on YouTube and you have the right stuff to move forward.

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I get business for my video production company?
    I've posted on Craig. I have a website at www.sunnysidemediagroup.com and I have a yellow page ad. However, business is slow.

    • ANSWER:
      Ok first, I took the time to look at your website and your videos. You have a good start. As a media production company, however, I would think first, PUMP up the site, I think I had to put two pairs of glasses on to read it, the font is small. Second, it's boring., Can you put more color or better links. I thought at first the short child film was all you had for examples. Is your specialty 10 second short child films? Then don't lead with it. Cute kid I must say, however, that is extra. Target the business crowd. I could not get through citi, it drove me crazy, way to long of credits and dance scene..but they liked it so who am I to judge.
      Make a FAKE video training cd.
      Train on the proper way to use the new copier.
      or whatever
      but make it serious, like I as a business owner would want to see it.
      Then write, see a sample of how your HR tape can look, or how your how to use the copier video can look (dont do a copier, but you get the idea).
      Then, put this on a cd. Put a commercial for YOU on the CD.
      Make it look good. No dang long credits on the front, that was bad. AND no long music scenes. Business people are not MTV.
      ~~~Now, target your market, call the HR dept and find out who is in charge of hiring. BEgin sending out the cd's.
      get their email addys.
      The script (use a script so you dont forget one word),
      make a sheet, with the words, and then places for the questions.
      JOE:
      Hi, this is JOE of Sunnyside, I am looking for the person in charge of hiring
      PERSON: Oh she is right here, can I tell her what this is about?
      JOE: YEs, it is about hiring, and what is her name?------(write answer in)

      Mary, I would like to send a CD over to you that has some very interesting information about how to make your job as the HR manager easier. Can I send it in care of ...blah blah blah vompany?
      Mary:
      Sure that woudl be fine.
      JOE: Great Mary, can I get your email, I woud just like to check in and make sure it gets delivered to you.
      Sure, maryat aanycompany.com

      Great, thansk so much Mary and we will be speaking.

      Call mary, 4 days after she gets the cd...

      get the idea?

      Good Luck

  22. QUESTION:
    How do I attempt to become an actress?
    My whole life I have dreamt of becoming an actress, and reality suddenly struck me.. Like its something I really want to do and get in to. I'm only 15, so this could be something I grow up doing? I'm not very wealthy, so I can't afford to go to any special drama schools. But does anyone know what else I can do?

    • ANSWER:
      There's a lot you can do. You don't have to attend a special drama school, but you might want to check out some acting classes in your area. Something with a good reputation. Voice lessons and dance lessons could be fun too.

      Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, or other local productions. Join a choir, dance troupe or other performance group if those interest you.

      You or your parents could contact any film schools/programs in the area to see where they get actors for student films. Check the website for your local film commission to see what's happening in your area.

      Check into if there are any speech/drama clubs (or maybe starting one) so you could compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions.

      Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor.

      Play improv games with your friends, create your own home movies, put on your own productions Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      If you decide that you want to try to have a career in acting, then you need to understand that professional acting is a business. You (or your parents if you're a minor) have to understand the industry to make sure people don't take advantage of you. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there. A few websites that can help:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

  23. QUESTION:
    What do you guys think of the movie Gladiator?
    Did you like it? Was it well done? Like the soundtrack? Because I havent seen it and I am thinking about going out to buy it. Should I watch it?

    • ANSWER:
      I HATED it and thought it totally, completely overrated. AND not well done.

      But most people seem to have liked it quite a bit.

      Why I disliked the movie so much?

      Numerous reasons: I worked in the film industry for over 25 years - and I thought that the big battle scene at the beginning was disorganized, with poor photography - and the cutaways to the Romans were often mis-matched... you'd see the Romans moving from the left of the screen to the right . . . and the next shot, you'd see the Romans moving from the right side of the screen to the left! What - were they fighting themselves??

      The individual fights were edited like TV commercials - where they've only got 20 seconds to sell you the soap - so they cut as many shots as possible into the timeslot. This is cheap MTV editing (something that director Ridley Scott is adictted to - only he keeps forgetting he's making a feature movie). The cuts are so fast, you can bearly make out what's happening. Most editors HATE this kind of editing - they've even came up with a name for it ... "frame-f***ing" (no kidding!).

      There was lots of great action footage shot (you can see this in the bonus features of the DVD), only director Scott threw most of this away in order to have really, really, really short action scenes. If you ever want to see how a great action scene should go - watch anything by Spielberg (SAVING PRIVATE RYAN, MINORITY REPORT, JAWS) or by JAMES CAMERON (TERMINATOR II and TITANIC), or the fight scenes in SPARTACUS and THE VIKINGS.

      The director was obsessed with making the interiors look overly dark (even in the daytime).

      The scenes in the Colloseum are odd action scenes - watch the one near the end of the movie that involves several tigers ... you'll notice the tigers are there... suddenly in the next shot, one's gone... that's because there were all added in post production as visual effects, and Scott never showed you exactly were the tigers were as they surrounded the gladiator, so they'd "be there & suddenly not be there" in the next shot. Funny as all get out.

      - everyone calls the gladiator "Spaniard." Obviously, the script intended for the character to come from Spain (not Australia!). Anyway, this reference should have been deleted when Russell Crowe was cast... but it wasn't, and it's distinctly odd.

      Worst thing - if you know your history (I do) and pray that Hollywood gets it's history right (even a little bit) when it shows Real Historical Characters in a movie, well . . . the Emperor in this film is written/played 180 degrees different than the real person. The truly sad, pathetic thing is - the real Emperor Commodus was far, far more interesting, bloodthirsty, and strange than the way he was written for this film. Jeeze, it's like someone made up a whole different story about the early US - then decided to throw Lincoln into it and make him do things wildly different than ANYTHING he did in real life. Oh well. In that case - you just have to view this movie as a pure fantasy.

      One last thing - the original ending in the script was far better & more satisfying. But one of the major actors (I won't say which one) passed away, so there was a radical re-write done at the last second, and computers were used to make "doubles" of this actor in a few rewritten scenes. Very tragic & sad.

      Anyway - go & see it. You'll probably love it.

  24. QUESTION:
    Advice to promote my acting skills on youtube?
    Hey everyone I'm on a mission to become an film actor. My question is what would be some types of videos I could upload on YouTube by myself to showcase my personality and acting skills? Like what would be good scripts to upload? Or any other advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Youtube is useless for actors - don't waste your time.
      Professional producers, agents and directors wouldn't bother trawling through the hundreds of thousands of clips which kids put on there, and no serious actor would post stuff there anyway.

      To be an actor you'd need years of training and stage experience - then audition for some short films and student films, so then you'd have enough material to get a showreel compiled which you could send to agents.
      And actors have to be ready to act live on stage as well as to camera - that's real acting, how an agent would see you perform and maybe offer to represent you.

  25. QUESTION:
    Billy Elliot is written to be performed in the style of a naturalistic musical it is structured as?
    What do i write now i need this for essay
    HOW IS IT STUCTURED WHAT IS THE CULTURE?

    Can any one conpare it to billy liar

    • ANSWER:
      A naturalistic musical is one where the story is told very naturally, and the music and dance flows out of the story naturally, rather than people bursting into song and dance (eg: like in Oliver!). In Billy Eliot, you don't get Billy's dad singing anything, because he wouldn't do anything like that in real life. Much of the music was pop, such as the T Rex tracks that were popular when the musical was set (the 1980s miners strike). The following text is from the official website:-

      The inspiration to write the story for Billy Elliot came in a flash to screenwriter Lee Hall while living in America and writing about his own childhood. The story gestated for about a year, mostly because Hall was working on other projects, then in a flurry of inspiration, he completed the first draft in three weeks.

      After further researching the art of ballet by visiting the Royal Ballet School to interview dancers hailing from small villages like Billy's, Hall showed the screenplay to Greg Brenman, head of Tiger Aspect's drama department, who was immediately taken by the story.

      "The idea of a young boy growing up in a tough mining village who wants to become a ballet dancer was fantastically engaging," says Brenman.

      The script was developed with executive producer Tessa Ross at BBC Films, and when Brenman felt it was ready he contacted producer Jon Finn who was heading up WT_, a division of Working Title Films, the company behind such hits as Notting Hill, Elizabeth and Four Weddings and a Funeral. Appointed in 1996 as production executive for Working Title Films, Finn set up WT_ with executive producer Natascha Wharton in 1999. WT_ aims to cultivate the talent of emerging writers, directors and producers in the UK. Billy Elliot is WT_'s first project.

      For Finn, there was a deep connection to the story. "My grandfather was a miner and I know those communities well. In fact, all the family on my mother's side worked in the pits in the area where we filmed."

      "I also knew the feeling of leaving a tight-knit community because I was the first person in my own family to leave home and go to college," reveals Finn.

      "Lee's screenplay was wonderfully moving and powerful," continues Brenman. "It was also very funny."

      Hall's screenplay also touched on the 1984 miners' strike, which for him was one of the defining moments in British history since the war.

      "I wanted to write about it obliquely by looking at the various tensions within the community which were crucial in determining the strike's failure," Hall says. "The story sort of wrote itself once I had the image of the kid at odds with his family and the community and pitted against a larger, hostile world."

      The strike had affected everyone living in the North East. "It was a class war where the state was mobilized against a small group of people," Hall continues. "It left me with a sense of indignation which has fueled much of my work."

      Thankfully, Finn was as taken by the script as Brenman has been, and together they approached Stephen Daldry to direct the film."

      This was the second time Finn was to team up with Stephen Daldry. In 1998, Finn produced the short film Eight, the Jerwood Film Prize-winning script that was also nominated for a BAFTA. And Billy Elliot was to become Daldry's feature film debut.

      Already recognized in London as the "face of contemporary theatre," the man behind the long running An Inspector Calls, the artistic director of the Royal Court (the most successful theatre in England), and the producer, director and creator of a string of critically-acclaimed theatrical productions gracing London's and Broadway's foremost stages, Daldry was well equipped to segue into feature films.

      Daldry was in the middle of a three-year deal with Working Title and responded swiftly to Lee Hall's script. "I knew immediately that I wanted to direct this film by the simple fact that the script moved me," confirms Daldry. "It made me want to read it again."

      Eric Fellner, co-chairman of Working Title, supported Daldry's progression into features. "Stephen is intellectually and creatively stimulating, and he is incredible on a visual and aesthetic level," says Fellner, who serves as executive producer on the project.

  26. QUESTION:
    Why do teachers withold useful information?
    I have been answering questions in YA for a short time and I am coming across a lot of questions from young people about university choices and career options. It has become clear that many young people are not being properly advised about their options by careers departments at schools in the UK. Some don't even know that their is a difference in standards between universities. What is the point of having career advice departments that don't advise?

    "Follow your dream" is not realistic, or helpful or good advice to someone trying to assess what to do with the rest of their life. Only study subjects that you enjoy is also not realistic, or only do a job that you enjoy is also not realistic and is poor quality education. What can be done to make sure that careers advice is realistic?

    Some of the courses that young people are asking about on various forums of the various media studies type like journalism, set design, film studies, media studies, script writing show that they have had appalling information about the chances of them ever getting work in their chosen subject.

    I would love to know what career advice departments give students thinking of studying these media study courses that only benefit the universities and offer nothing to their students?

    • ANSWER:
      In the U.S., it's the job of the school counselors to advise students about applying to universities and about career options. However, in some schools, counselors are too busy with drug addicted, mentally disturbed, pregnant teen-agers and other problems to pay much attention to the kids who are achieving. Why don't you volunteer at your local school to give some talks on careers or meet with students and give advice?

  27. QUESTION:
    How do you start in showbiz?
    I always hear that you need to act in plays and the like, but c'mon, I don't think Brad Pitt, Johnny Depp and others did that. How do you get an agent then???

    • ANSWER:
      At Kickapoo High School, Pitt was involved in sports, debating, student government and school musicals. Pitt attended the University of Missouri, where he majored in journalism with a focus on advertising. He occasionally acted in fraternity shows. He left college two credits short of graduating to move to California. Before he became successful at acting, Pitt supported himself by driving strippers in limos, moving refrigerators and dressing as a giant chicken while working for "el Pollo Loco."

      Johnny Depp dropped out of school at age 15 (1978) in the hopes of becoming a rock musician. He fronted a series of garage bands including The Kids, which once opened for Iggy Pop. Depp got into acting after a visit to Los Angeles, California, with his former wife, Lori Anne Allison, who introduced him to actor Nicolas Cage. He made his film debut in A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). In 1987 he shot to stardom when he replaced Jeff Yagher in the role of undercover cop Tommy Hanson in the popular TV series "21 Jump Street" (1987).

      In 1990, after numerous roles in teen-oriented films, his first of a handful of great collaborations with director Tim Burton came about when Depp played the title role in Edward Scissorhands (1990). Following the film's success, Depp carved a niche for himself as a serious, somewhat dark, idiosyncratic performer, consistently selecting roles that surprised critics and audiences alike. He continued to gain critical acclaim and increasing popularity by appearing in many features before re-joining with Burton in the lead role of Ed Wood (1994). In 1997 he played an undercover FBI agent in the fact-based film Donnie Brasco (1997), opposite Al Pacino; in 1998 he appeared in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), directed by Terry Gilliam; and then, in 1999, he appeared in the sci-fi/horror film The Astronaut's Wife (1999). The same year he teamed up again with Burton in Sleepy Hollow (1999), brilliantly portraying Ichabod Crane.

      Depp has played many characters in his career, including another fact-based one, Insp. Fred Abberline in From Hell (2001). He stole the show from screen greats such as Antonio Banderas in the finale to Robert Rodriguez's "mariachi" trilogy, Once Upon a Time in Mexico (2003). In that same year he starred in the marvelous family blockbuster Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003), playing a character that only the likes of Depp could pull off: the charming, conniving and roguish Capt. Jack Sparrow. Now Depp is collaborating again with Burton in a screen adaptation of Roald Dahl's novel, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005).
      ==============

      Neither of them got big agents until they were in big demand.

      Both bummed around hollywood, networking, meeting people and finally getting somewhere after a few years of trying.

      Pitt is almost a college graudate.

      And you have to go to Los Angeles.

      I knew Bill Bob Thronton when he was hanging around the studio while Cynda Williams was singing with the band. He had his script, which he had to star and and direct.

      A couple of years later he did it and got an Oscar nomination.

      But it took years and he did bit parts in Wyatt Earp and other films learning the trade.

      Another friend of mine (whose ex-husband played guitar with Iggy Pop) went from non-union extra to SAG actor but lost K a year when she joined the union because she couldn't to non-union work anymore and SAG work is not easy to get.

      Also have ,500 ready to buy your SAG card in one payment, certified check. You need it to work a second day.

      Also understand the work days are 10-14 hours, sometimes 6 days a week (minimum pay for that is around ,000 a week before taxes and agent fees, about ,000 take home and on a feature that's 4 weeks shooting and your out of work again with ,000 in your pocket and 0 a week in unemployment insurnace for 26 weeks)

  28. QUESTION:
    What do you think of my short film script?
    You can download it as a PDF from:
    http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=c4090055d1a3f9f6d2db6fb9a8902bda

    Or online as embedded flash:
    http://pdfmenot.com/view/http://pdfmenot.com/store_local/47762ab809c41ea96d4e069b2df74b4c.pdf

    Its for a college project. I'm particularly conscious that the dialogue is weak so please feel free to offer suggestions and criticism.

    • ANSWER:
      it actually pretty good
      you have some sick talent kid

  29. QUESTION:
    Where can I find real acting auditions?
    I live in Alabama and there is never any auditions around here. I love acting and want to become an actress. I am 15 and I want to know how I can find real casting calls. All the websites and things I have looked at are know to be scams! Can anyone please let me know how I can find real casting calls or how to? You would be such a great help to get my carrier started!

    • ANSWER:
      Well, if you're looking for a professional acting career you have to understand that professional acting is a business. Companies invest a lot of money in their productions and they trust that investment to trained and experienced professionals so most auditions for major roles are done through talent agents - not open auditions. And if you want to have this career as a minor, your parents HAVE to be involved. Basically have a professional acting career is like starting your own company and YOU are the product. It's not just about showing up at some audition and being "discovered". It involves casting directors, talent agents, industry contracts, acting unions, professional headshots and resumes, acting reels, entertainment work permits & trust accounts (required for minors if you want to legally work for an production company based in CA or NYC). You & your parents will have to have a good idea of how best to market you and your skills. Your parents will have to build a network of contacts in the industry in order to find out about opportunties. We're talking a huge investment of time, effort and money for you and your parents with no guarantee of a return on that investment.

      Be careful and be smart. As you've said there are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there that prey on people who think they just need to be noticed and they'll be set. The best way to protect yourself is for you and your parents to have a good understanding of the industry. Here are some websites for you:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

      And you don't have to have a professional career as a child to have a professional career as an adult. If you truely have a passion for acting and performinng (and are not in it for fame, attention or the like) there are several things you can do. Take some acting classes. Voice lessons and dance classes might be fun too. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, local productions, whatever. You can also join a choir, dance troup or other performance group. Contact any film schools/programs in the area to see where they get actors for student films. Check the website for your local film commission to see what's happening in your area. Check into speech/drama clubs and compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions. Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor without having to worry about making a career of it. And if you can't find opportutnies - create your own. Get together with friends and start an improv troup to perform locally. Put on a talent show to raise money for a local charity. Create your own home movie or webseries. Have fun being creative.

      Good luck.

  30. QUESTION:
    How do I get to audition for movies?
    I have always loved musical theater. I'm 13. I have had plenty of experience in theater. I played Annie in the musical Annie at community theater and I've been in several other plays. Everybody tells me that I'm extremely good, especially for my age. Also, if you have ever seen the musical Annie, it involves singing. I can sing VERY well i'm told. I want to take it to the next level. I love movies like "Pitch Perfect" and "Glee". Any movie works though. I know most start out in commercials. I would love to be in a commercial too. I can see myself in glee or pitch perfect. Anyone know anymore info on how to find auditions? I live on a rural farm so theres not much oppurtunity here. But i'm willing to move do whatever it takes. I just need the right help getting auditions and getting my name into the pot! I know I have what it takes. If anyone happend to be a proffessional, that would be FANTASTIC! Also if anyone knows of any auditions right off the bat that would be awesome too. Anybodys info is helpful!

    • ANSWER:
      Companies invest a lot of money into their productions and they trust that investment to trained and experienced professionals, so major movies, TV shows and even commercials are cast through talent agents not open audition. Professional acting is a business. If you want to have a professional acting career as a minor, your parents HAVE to be involved.

      Basically having a professional acting career is like starting your own company and YOU are the product. It's not just about showing up at some audition. It involves casting directors, talent agents, industry contracts, acting unions, professional headshots and resumes, acting reels, entertainment work permits & trust accounts (required for minors if you want to legally work for an production company based in CA or NYC). You & your parents will have to have a good idea of how best to market you and your skills. Your parents will have to build a network of contacts in the industry in order to find out about opportunties. We're talking a huge investment of time, effort and money for you and your parents with no guarantee of a return on that investment.

      Be careful and be smart. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there that prey on people who think they just need to be noticed and they'll be set. The best way to protect yourself is for you and your parents to have a good understanding of the industry. Here are some websites for you:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

      And you don't have to have a professional career as a child to have a professional career as an adult. If you truely have a passion for acting and performing (and are not in it for fame, attention or the like) there are several things you can do. Take some acting classes. Voice lessons and dance classes might be fun too. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, local productions, whatever. You can also join a choir, dance troup or other performance group. Contact any film schools/programs in the area to see where they get actors for student films. Check the website for your local film commission to see what's happening in your area. Check into speech/drama clubs and compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions. Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor and performer without having to worry about making a career of it. And if you can't find opportutnies - create your own. Get together with friends and start an improv troup to perform locally. Put on a talent show to raise money for a local charity. Create your own home movie or webseries. Have fun being creative.

      When you get older, if you still want a career you can look into acting schools/programs. It's not required for a career, but it can be helpful A good, quality program can not only improve your skills but prepare you for the industry. Plus it's a good way to start to network and make connections in the industry.

      Good luck.

  31. QUESTION:
    How to become an actor?
    Im a 13 year old girl, i took acting classes when i was little, im pretty and talented and i know i have what it takes to act. I live in Phoenix Arizona. Please help me, tips?

    • ANSWER:
      Pretty much as I explained in your last question - except that since your'e a minor your parents HAVE to be involved. Professional acting is a business and requries contracts and the like - you can't do it without your parents support. You'll need an entertainment work permit to work professionally (since your'e a minor) - http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/child_labor_law/7508

      It's not like school, where you can just sign up for some open auditions. Like I explained before, casting is done through talent agents. Your parents will HAVE to have a good understanding of the business end of things to make sure people don't take advantage of you. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there.

      Some websites you and your parents should look over:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/

      You don't have to have a professional career as a child to have one as an adult. So you can just focus now on building a reputation as a talented and mature actor where you are.

      So do the acting classes. It's good to have dance lessons, maybe check into voice lessons too. Audition for what you can - school plays, community theater and the like. Perform with choirs, dance troupes, or other performing groups,. Read a ton of plays and scripts, keeping an eye out for monologues and characters you love and want to develop. Maybe perform those for your parents and friends. Read other things too (novels, poems, short stories). Understanding language and storytelling will help you with your acting.

      Look into speech/drama clubs and competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions. Contact local film schools and ask about how they find actors for student films and check out those sources. Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunities are there. Get together with friends and play improv games, make your own home movies or web series or put on your own show. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      And you can look into acting schools/programs for after high school. It's not required for a professional career, but it can be helpful. Not only do you build your acting skills, but going to a good, quality school with well-respected instructors is a good way to start to make contacts in the industry.

      Good luck.

  32. QUESTION:
    How can I become a noticed actor!?
    I'm only 13 years old, and there's this TV show I really want to be on! I've done some research though and it looks like they only hire experienced actors. I am a great actor, but I can't do plays because there aren't that many where I live. Any suggestions please!
    I'm not going to lie!

    • ANSWER:
      You have to understand that professional acting is a business. Companies invest a lot of money in their productions so of course they're going to trust that investment to trained and experienced professionals. You'll need more than to think you're a great actor or get "noticed" to become a professional actor. SOME of the things you'll need:

      * Parents who are actively involved and have a good understanding of the business end of the industry. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there. You parents will need to do the research to understand the entire casting process, the players involved, what they do and don't do and many other things. Some websites that are helpful with that:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/

      * As a minor you would would probably need things like an entertainment work permit and a trust account established in your name to legally work in the entertainment industry.

      * A professional head shot, acting resume, and acting demo reel.

      * Most TV productions are union, so preference is given to actors who belong to the SAG-AFTRA union. So you would need to belong to the union or at the very least you and your parents would need an understanding of how unions work.

      * A licensed talent agent would be helpful. Agents are paid on commission (never pay an agent up front). Since they are paid only if their clients are paid, they are picky about who they take on as clients. You can't just go out and hire an agent, it's more like they choose you. So you'll need the training and experience to demonstrate to an agent that you can book professional jobs.

      * A good network of connections in the industry. The way you find out about opportunities is through who you know in the industry.

      So it's a lot of work to try to have a chance at maybe getting a role on a specific television show.

      Now, casting directors for a show do write "breakdowns" which is a description of the projects and the roles they want to cast. Usually these breakdowns are sent to licensed talent agents and managers only. Sometimes there are websites that list the breakdowns for some roles and include the name and contact information for the casting director. It would be a huge long shot, but you could try mailing in your professional head shot, resume and an acting reel (if you have one) to the casting director for the show. And if you don't live where the show is filming, that reduces your chances even more. I should warn you that there's a very good chance that whatever you send will just end up in the trash.

      If you happen to live where they film the show, you might be able to be an extra on the show. Depending on where you live you might still need the work permit and trust account. Union rules would require that a parent/guardian be on set with you at all times and you're limited on the when and how many hours you could work. For all these reasons, children are not often cast as extras.

      So, I'm sorry but I don't know how realistic it is to think you can get on this show. But if you really love acting, you can focus on building a reputation as a talented and mature actor where you are now. Take acting classes or look for an acting coach. Voice lessons and dance lessons can be helpful too. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, local productions. You can perform with a choir or dance troupe or other performance group. Check into a speech/drama club at your school (or consider staring one) and maybe competing in the acting divisions of forensic speech/drama competitions. Read plays and scripts - all kinds. Keep an eye out for characters and monologues you want to develop. Read other things too, novels, short stories, poems - understanding language and storytelling will help you as an actor. If there are any film schools/programs in your area you could contact them about how they find actors for student films. (Although most student films use older actors, but you could check just to see). You can also get together with your friends and play improv games, make your own movies or web series, or put on your own performances. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      You don't have to have a professional career as a child to have one as an adult. So if you think you might want to try a professional acting career, you can look into an acting school/program for after high school. It's not required for a professional acting career, but it can be helpful. A good quality school with well-respected instructors can help build your skills and is a good way to start networking in the industry. And of course learn the business end of things.

      Good luck.

  33. QUESTION:
    what are some good legit acting/modeling agencies for teens?
    Hi, my dream is to become a model/actress not for the fame or money but because I adore it. I just turned 14 & I know that I'm very young & fame can sometimes destroy a child's life & I get that... so if anybody has tips, suggestions or recommendations. I'd greatly appreciate it. Oh, i live in Indianapolis, Indiana if that helps.

    • ANSWER:
      You only need an agent if you want to work professionally and professional acting is a business. As a minor your parents will HAVE to be involved. They'll have to have a good enough understanding of the industry to determine if you even need to have an agent at this point. (There might not be enough professional work in your are for you to have an agent.) You would need a local agent, an agent in LA is not going to represent an unknown actor in IN (sorry). You (or your parents) can check the SAG-AFTRA website or backstage.com for some legitimate local agents.

      But first you and your parents should read up and do more research about the business end of acting. I think you probably have a very unrealistic understanding of what professional acting all involves. Plus there are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there and you'll need to understand how things work so people don't take advantage of you. Here are some websites you might want to look over:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

      My tip, suggestion and recommendation would be for you to bloom where you're planted. Since it's not fame you're after - then you can just focus on learning and growing as an actor where you are. So take acting classes; voice and dance classes too if those interest you. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theaters, local productions. You or your parents can contact local film schools/programs and ask how they find actors for their student films and check those resources. Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunities are there. You can also perform with a choir, dance group, or other performing group. Check out speech/drama clubs and look into competing in the acting categories of forensic competitions. Read plays and scripts - all kinds - and keep an eye out for characters and monologues you love and want to develop. And perform them for friends and family. Read other things too - novels, short stories, poetry. An understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor. And have fun acting! Get together with friends and play improv games, make your own movies or web shows, put on your own performances.

      You can start to research more about the business end of acting and what is needed to have a professional acting career to help you figure out if that is something you really want to pursue as a career. You can check into acting schools/programs for after high school. It's not required for a professional acting career, but it can be very helpful.

      Good luck.

  34. QUESTION:
    How can I become an actress?
    I'm almost 14 and I wanna be an actress very bad, but I don't know how to become one! Please help! Thank you!:)

    • ANSWER:
      Your first step is to talk to your parents. If you want to work professionally, they will HAVE to be involved. Professional acting is not like school. You can't just show up at some open audtiion and be cast. Professional acting is a business. It involves casting directors, talent agents, industry contracts, actor unions, networking and marketing. Depending on where you live and where you want to work you might need an entertainment work permit and a trust account established in your name to legally work in the entertainment industry.

      So do the acting classes. It's good to have dance lessons, maybe check into voice lessons too. Audition for what you can - school plays, community theater and the like. Perform with choirs, dance troupes, or other performing groups,. Read a ton of plays and scripts, keeping an eye out for monologues and characters you love and want to develop. Maybe perform those for your parents and friends. Read other things too (novels, poems, short stories). Understanding language and storytelling will help you with your acting.

      Look into speech/drama clubs and competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions. Contact local film schools and ask about how they find actors for student films and check out those sources. Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunities are there. Get together with friends and play improv games, make your own home movies or web series or put on your own show. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      While you do that, your parent can investigage the business end of acting. Some websites you and your parents should look over:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/

      Don't worry about trying to find an agent until you've gotten some experience and your parents are on board with the idea and have a good understanding of the business. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there and your parents will have to make sure no one takes advantage of you.

      And you can look into acting schools/programs for after high school. It's not required for a professional career, but it can be helpful. Not only do you build your acting skills, but going to a good, quality school with well-respected instructors is a good way to start to make contacts in the industry.

      Good luck.

  35. QUESTION:
    Can I become an actress without experience?
    It's always been my dream since i was little to be on disney and have movies and i think it would be a good time to look for casting calls since disney is making more shows staring kids my age. I am a good actress, determined have the "looks" but never taken any classes, theater, or acting camps. I think I have what it takes to be an actress but I'm not sure if anyone would take me seriously because i don't have experience. Any one have any help or suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      The steps to being an actor are the steps you take.
      Acting is usually one of three things: a Hobby, a Lifestyle and a Career.
      Already because of the three different meanings there are three different paths.
      In short, no path is the same and what worked for one person mightn't work for someone else.

      Anyone can pick Acting up as a Hobby.
      Whether it be picking up a script, grabbing yourself a camera, acting it out, filming it then uploading it to Youtube. Or seeing an audition notice in a local newspaper for an upcoming play, contacting the director, attending the audition and seeing how it goes.

      As a Lifestyle, you've decided that Acting means something more to you long term.
      Therefor it may be in your best interest to get involved with Acting Classes, Acting Schools, become a Member of a Theatre Company to generate more regular Acting Opportunities. Though how you enjoy Acting as part of your Lifestyle is up to you, same as enjoying Exercise as part of your Lifestyle.

      The website Starnow:
      http://www.starnow.com/curtisfarrell
      Provides opportunities for Actors interested in both of the above and occasional professional opportunities as well.
      For Actors in Australia I recommend against AT2 as it's very similar to Starnow - you get the same types of opportunities, though you have to pay over 0 more per year for them and they discriminate between Actors who do have an Agent and those who don't.

      If you're after Acting as a Career there are certain things inside of your control and outside of your control.
      What's inside of your control is keeping yourself ready, centered and focused - (this is usually done by keeping yourself busy with some acting opportunity whether it's paid or not). Having an Agent, representation, networking and looking for work.
      What's inside of your control are the avenues you have to generate work, what's outside of your control is the work that comes in.
      Lucky breaks are also outside of your control. You can do your best to be in the right place at the right time, though sometimes it's not a matter of what you know but who you know.

      When you're ready, here's how to Find and Apply for an Agent:
      http://www.youtube.com/user/Funstuff13613?feature=mhee#p/u/4/0nUBPVIwJTE
      It's how I got mine.

      Answers that give you a bulk ladder in how to become an actor are false.
      As anyone can become an Actor just as anyone can become a cook.
      Acting isn't the same as being famous and Acting means many different things to many different people.

      The best step for you to take, is the step that is available to you.
      Once you take that step I'm sure you will gain insight as to what you'd like to pursue and what step you'd like next to take.

      All the best :)

  36. QUESTION:
    What type of program should I use if I think my child needs to memorize common words but also learn phonics?
    Is this called whole language?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      I am a veteran homeschooler of 16+ years and I never in my life bought a program. No, I don't be live you would call what you are interested in doing "whole language".
      I also taught my kids the words that just don't follow a phonetic rule such as "are", "the", "where", "was" and others that give some people headaches in spelling.
      I took simple construction paper, cut out 52 pieces of all the same size (or roughly the same), about 2"x2", then had my child cut out letters from the alphabet that I wanted them to cut out. We learned what the vowels were first, so I had the child cut out all the capital (upper case) and small (lower case) vowels and paste them on a card. Then we went over the short vowel sounds and the long vowel sounds until I knew they understood. This took maybe 1-3 days total. Then I added the consonants RSTLN to the list and had the child cut out the upper and lower case letters listed from a magazine and paste these on a card we had made (construction paper). We then learned the sounds of these letters. Once the kids knew the sounds of these letters and the vowels, then we played a game where I would take one vowel and the consonants and put the consonants upside down, then had the child pick two consonants and make a word with the vowel we had chosen to work with that day. If the vowel was an A and the consonants were R and N then the word rn could be made. If the T and R was chosen then there were two words made, "rat" and "tar". We also had to talk about how sometimes a has a different sound from the two discussed.
      Long story short, I had a child who could read the comics in the newspaper by herself and most anything else within 6 weeks. I used the book, "Why Johnny Can't Read", by Rudolf Fleisch (originally published in 1955, but has never gone out of print!). Ihad read this book prior to using it, and we also used this book as a resource. I was able to borrow this book from the library for 28 days, then renewed it another 28 days. It was a great help!
      I taught most all of my eight kids to read in this same manner and had great success in getting them to read quickly. Not memorizing what they read, but really being able to decipher what they read. All are really good readers to this day (and all grown!).
      I had one child who was a late reader (she didn't learn to read until age 12 1/2), but you would never know it now (she just was not cognitively ready to learn to read until then) as she reads well, writes all the time, and has plans to be a writer. She is now 18, has written many scripts for films with the Teen Library Program, has wonderful punctuation skills, and a good grasp of grammar, though she is basically self-taught as she just decided one day she was going to read, got a book she wanted to read, then sat outside on the porch (it was June) and read wo large books that summer. Large adult-sized novels. And this from a kid who couldn't read a "Little Golden" book a few days prior!
      I am telling you this just in case you run into a child who has difficulty because their cognitive ability to read has not turned on yet. When it does, you cannot stop them from learning.
      Hope I've been helpful.

  37. QUESTION:
    how should i start my acting career.?
    I am a 12 year old kid but i am a amazing actor.1 thing i don't know how to get my talents reconized.

    • ANSWER:
      READ:
      "ACTING IS EVERYTHING (GOLD EDITION)"-JUDY KERR

      "SO YOU WANT TO BE IN SHOW BUSINESS?"- STEVEN R. STEVENS

      "ACTING TRUTHS AND LIES" (purchased at www.info4actors.com)

      TRAINING
      I think the first three classes that you should take before even engaging in a scene study/acting class are: Cold Reading, Commercials, and Improv.

      Why a cold reading class? How do you get the role? By auditioning! Auditioning and acting are two DIFFERENT worlds! In L.A. especially, the majority of your auditions are cold reads. You're lucky if you can get the sides the night before. Cold reading teaches you how to make sense of the script within a short period of time and also with in a limited space (you don't physicalize as much on auditions as you do when actually do the scene). After you get the part, you can always get an acting coach.

      Why commercials? Because those are the money jobs. Build your foundation with commercials so you can afford the best training and materials needed for a successful acting career. Commercials also don't require you to bust out your Meisner or Strasberg techniques. The commercial cds and clients just want to see real people.

      Improv is a must period. It teaches you how to not be self conscious, to use your imagination, and to make bold and quick choices. It also goes great with commercial auditions for a lot of them are improv.

      Stay away from those OVERPRICED "Acting/Modeling Schools" like JRP, John Casablancas, and Barbizon. All of those LA schools that I mentioned before JRP, JC, and Barb. are A LOT more affordable and actually RESPECTED in LA. Of course you can have those three scammy schools on your resume and get LAUGHED OUT of LA and any other MAJOR market.

      AGENTS
      To get an agent, you need to get GREAT headshots, a good resume, and training from the best. These are enough to get you a commercial agent at least. Getting a GOOD theatrical agent (Film/tv) takes longer. Most good theatrical agents won't see you unless you're SAG, have a polished resume, and a demo reel. Commercial agents are more lenient about that. What the best Commercial agents want to see on your resume are good commercial classes, improv, and cold reading.

      You can get an agent multiple ways. Here are a few common ways:
      -Attend a showcase and impress them
      -Mail in an unsealed manilla envelope with a CONCISE coverletter and headshot with the resume stapled on the back. If you have a demoreel include that too.
      -Get a referral from a friend who is with the agency that you're interested in

      DON'T
      -Email them unless they tell you to. IT'S UNPROFESSIONAL!
      -Call unless they tell you to. ALSO UNPROFESSIONAL!
      -Walk in and ask for a meeting. UNPROFESSIONAL THREE!
      -Sign with them if they ask for upfront money, make you take new photos with THEIR photographer, or take THEIR classes. Agent's ONLY make money when you do. Agents usually make 10% on film/tv and commercials and 20% on commercial print.

  38. QUESTION:
    how do you become a movie director or script wirter or somthing related to that?
    i still dont know what to do when im older

    • ANSWER:
      You write scripts and direct movies.

      Go. Start. Now.

      You can't just get a job as one, you've got to do it off your own back, get involved with other people doing the same, practice and hone your talents, create a body of work that shows how good you are, and THEN... look at getting an agent to sell your scripts or entering your films in festivals and trying to get distribution deals or hooking up with film producers that can. Of course, you can go to school and study writing or directing, or take private courses, but most of the greatest directors started off making their own short films when they were kids, and most writers practice for years before they actually make any money. So there's no time to lose.

      Get a couple of books about screenwriting and filmmaking. I recommend The Screenwriters Bible by David Trottier, and Filmmaking for Dummies.

  39. QUESTION:
    How to become a experienced actor?
    If Josh Hutcherson became a actor at 9 without experience how can I? I'm 14 and want to be a actor at least when I'm 16 how can I do this when I'm alittle shy but when I'm comfortable I'm told I'm a good actress so how van I do this???

    • ANSWER:
      First what is required of an actor who is 9 is very different than an actor who is a teenager. (More is expected of a teen.) And children who have professional careers get those through the hard work of their parents.

      Technically you can be an actor by being cast and performing in a production. If you're talking about something more professional - professional acting is a business. If you're thinking you can show up at some open audition and be "discovered" you're going to be disappointed. That's not how the industry works. You might be interested in the article "Why Hollywood is Reluctant to Cast Teens and Tweens" as they say:

      "They all think it is about being the star,” adds Belli. “They don’t realize that they don’t get a job until they have an audition, and they don’t get an audition until they have an agent. And they don’t get an agent until they have knocked down the doors or they have presented themselves in a competent fashion that says I’m a serious actor that wants to work and has something that is marketable at this moment.”

      See you can't just hire an agent. Agents are paid a percentage of what their clients make. (Never pay an agent up front). Since they are paid only if their clients are paid, they are picky about who they take on as clients. And they can be picky because there are a lot more people wanting to be actors than there are roles. So agents are looking for clients who have demonstrated their commitment to an acting career through their talent, training and experience.

      But if you're really interested in acting - then you can "bloom where you are planted" and try what you can where you live. Take acting classes. Voice lessons and dance lessons too if they interest you. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, local productions. You can perform with a choir, dance troupe or other performance group. You or your parents could try contacting local film schools/programs and see how they find actors for student films and check out those resources. You can look at the website for your local film commission and see what's available there. Look into speech/drama clubs and competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions. Read plays and scripts, all different kinds, keeping an eye out for characters and monologues you love. Read other things too, novels, short stories, poetry. An understanding of language and story telling can help you as an actor. Get together with friends and play improv games, create your own movie or webseries, put on your own productions. Have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      And if you're serious about trying to have a professional career as a minor, your parents are going to have to research the business end of the industry. They're going to have to understand the entire casting process, who is involved and what they do (and don't do). They'll have to know what professional work is available in your area to see if it's even worth you getting an agent at this time. They'll have to understand industry contracts, actor unions, taxes, and legal restrictions on minors working in the industry. Some states require minors to have entertainment work permits and trust accounts established in their name. (If you want to work for a company out of CA or NY you'll need those). Here are some websites with information for you and your parents:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

      We're talking a big investment of time, effort and money for you and your parents. If you're looking for fame, attention, popularity, money or the like - you'll be disappointed. Frannkly those are dumb reasons for trying to have an acting career. However, if you really do have a passion for acting you can give it a try. But if you do - do it smart.

      Good luck.

  40. QUESTION:
    I really want to act! How can I start? All help is appreciated?
    I was watching behind the scenes of tv shows and I realized this is really what I want to do. Im pretty good at memorizing lines. So how do I get started? What should I do? Im 14 and we don't have a ton of extra money so I can't do super expensive classes or anything. I want to do tv shows later on.

    • ANSWER:
      You don't have to take super expensive classes, but you might want to look into what acting classes are available in your area. Something with a good reputation. Voice lessons and dance lessons could be fun too as you can afford them.

      Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, or other local productions. Join a choir, dance troupe or other performance group if those interest you.

      You or your parents could contact any film schools/programs in the area to see where they get actors for student films. Check the website for your local film commission to see what's happening in your area.

      Check into if there are any speech/drama clubs (or maybe starting one) so you could compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions.

      Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor.

      Play improv games with your friends, create your own home movies, put on your own productions Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      If you decide that you want to try to have a career in acting, then you need to understand that professional acting is a business. You (or your parents if you're a minor) have to understand the industry to make sure people don't take advantage of you. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there, so make sure you and your parents really do the research. A few websites that can help:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

  41. QUESTION:
    What happens to a child taken into child services? (READ MORE FOR DETAILS)?
    I'm writing a script for a short film and I was wondering what happens if the parents of a child lets say gets in a car accident and are in a comma. (This is hypotheticly speaking) What happens to the child? Where is the place they go to first. Where would they sleep that very night they are taken. (This excludes going to a relative's house or close friends house or god father/mothers)
    This is important that I dont look stupid in making this. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      what country and was the child also in the car and if NOT how would they know about the kid??I see where you are going but how does the child get "into" the story in the first place.

  42. QUESTION:
    Whats a good, easy story book to make a film adaptation of?
    Need ideas for a college video project.

    • ANSWER:
      Companions of the Night.

      A lot of people might run away from it, because it's a vampire novel. But it's not what you would think. It's definitely witty, and definitely anti-Twilight.
      It's an easy read as well. There are psychological factors, subtle... but it's there. Very little "effects." It's very... "real" I guess you could say. And the story all happens in one day.

      Or... you can try for one of the short stories in "All Hallows Eve" by Vivian Vande Velde. I suggest either the short story "Best Friends" or "My Real Mother"

      Vivian Vande Velde writes her stories like movie scripts. I'm not even kidding.

  43. QUESTION:
    What do for acting in Orlando fl?
    Im 13, and I have been wanting to get into acting for a long time. After I come from acting classes what do I do? Should I start with small roles before I get into big rolls?? I also live in Orlando Florida.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a lot of things you can try for acting in Orlando - you can start with some acting classes. Voice lessons and dance lessons could be fun too. Audition for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, or other local productions. Join a choir, dance troupe or other performance group. Your parents could contact any film schools/programs in the area to see where they get actors for student films. Check the website for your local film commission to see what's happening in your area. Check into if there are any speech/drama clubs (or maybe starting one) so you could compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions. Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor. Play improv games with your friends, create your own home movies, put on your own productions. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      If you're wanting more professional work as a minor, then you have to talk to your parents and they'll have to be involved. Professional acting is a business. It's like starting your own company and YOU are the product. Your parents are going to have to do the research to understand the business end of acting - how the casting process works, who the players are, what they do (and don't do), what professional work is actually avalable where you live. They'll have to network and make connections in the industry. They'll have to understanding industry contracts, actor unions, and the legal restrictions for minors in the entertainment industry. They'll have to be willing to be the CEO of your career. There are a lot of scams and ripoffs out there - so they'll have to understand how things work so people don't take advantage of you.

      Some websites for you (and your parents):

      http://www.bizparentz.org/
      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/
      http://youngperformers.sagaftra.org/files/youngperformers/YPH_FNL3.pdf

  44. QUESTION:
    What movies do you praise to impress people?
    What movies or which of these movies do you praise to appear intelligent and be told you have such great taste?

    Citizen Kane
    Casablanca
    Gone With The Wind
    The Godfather
    Memento
    2001: A Space Odyssey
    The Godfather Part 2

    Notice these are mostly films that are ones that receive mass critical acclaim. According to what I've seen in Internet movie forums, anyone who claims any one of those above films is boring or no good is told they have a short attention span, low IQ and need lots of car chases, guns and explosions with little or no capacity to understand anything that's "intellectually" stimulating. So which of these films do you claim to like just to appear intelligent?

    • ANSWER:
      Gone with the Wind and Casablanca ARE fantastic films! They're on that top list because people love them! Casablanca was that little film that didn't have a chance; it was low-budget, the script was being written as it was filmed, and Ingrid Bergman didn't know WHO she was going to end up with. The main reason it captured attention was that a conference of world leaders was held at Casablanca, which placed it in people's minds. When they saw what a wonderful film this was, it became a hit. Then, it sort of fell to the side till, in the late Sixties, college kids fell in love with it. (I was one of them though I already was a fan of the movie.) It's perfect!

      Gone with the Wind is an amazing accomplishment because it's an epic in which the characters don't get lost in what's going on around them. Scarlett and Rhett will remain one of the most magnetic movie couples of all time. I imagine that most fans just KNOW that they'll get back together. (I'm ignoring the dreadful "Scarlett" novel and miniseries!)

      Citizen Kane IS overrated. I agree with that. It's too self-conscious for one thing. But, it did break out of the Hollywood mold, and Orson Welles had that one time when he was in total control. No. I never name it as a favorite. I actually criticize it to other movie buffs, and we get to have a grand argument.

      The Godfather novel is what is called a potboiler. Mario Puzo wrote it to make money; he's admitted that! Then, they did the film, and everyone got caught up in all the Mafia/gangster junkerama that emerged afterward, including the Sopranos. I detest this genre that urges people to emulate and even admire these people. Yes, there are some good performances in The Godfather trilogy, but they aren't films I'd bother watching after having seen them.

      Memento: I've never seen this placed on a list with any of the others. I'm unsure why anyone would include this with the rest.

      2001: A Space Odyssey I shall continue to defend because it was so groundbreaking. I was in the theater to see it originally. You can snub it now, but it definitely is a landmark and forced people to consider science fiction as adult material, not "kid stuff". It made people really think about it; it turned on a lot of people to classical music; and it still is a great conversation-starter. We've never gotten to where we say, "Oh, it means this." Interpretations will always differ.

      I don't praise films to impress people. I never have. I'm a dedicated film buff who approaches films as openly as I can~unless the ads revolt me so much that I fear watching them. For example, I wouldn't critique the American Pie movies without seeing them; yet, from what I've heard, I don't think I want to risk watching them. When people praise all of those Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers films, I tell them that I'd rather have a tape of the dance numbers and pass up the stories; most of the time, they're pure fluff. However, I won't put down a film if someone can defend it to me, give me examples of why it's good, funny, entertaining, etc. I've heard people come up with some very good defenses.

      I would ask this: Have you watched all of these films? You might find that there's a reason that one or more are listed. Most of the time, it's not to "impress people"; they really like the film(s).

      I suspect that a lot of people agree with their friends that such and such films are great when they really don't think that at all. They're afraid to disagree with others.

  45. QUESTION:
    Oldest daughter wants to be actress when she grows up? This a good idea at 15?
    I have 3 kids 9, 12 and 15 and my oldest Veronica http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=o90heh&s=6 wants to be an actress. She just started in a short film called "TEASED" about a girl 15 years who has two younger brothers and before school she ends up teasing and laughing at her 10 year old little brother about being adopted, and then there mom with her head in clouds sends him off to school only to picked on by the kids in his class. Feeling his not wanted at home or school he runs away on a journey only to have his family go find him before he discovers the true meaning of family. It's such a hart warming, sad and sometime funny story about dealing with issue of teasing and be teased my daughter did such a great job on screen I think the role of older sister Hayley was a perfect fit. We just found out she won a new young talent award for her role of Hayley at our local film festival as a mom she wants to do a lot more acting in the future. http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2m2bb7s&s=6

    Do you think this was right first role and should Should I let my daughter go into acting this young even if she really good?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe so. For college, I interned for a non-profit organization called Scenarios USA, and the organization encourages youth to reach out to other youth through films discussing common issues that teens may go through. Teens participate by writing a script for a short film that they are inspired to come up with, and they find teens to act. This could be how many teens can get their start when it comes to film. Therefore, it would be great if she already has the experience, and gains more experience in acting and film. She can start now, and explore the film, and acting industry on her own, and she she is sure she feels mighty comfortable in it, she can study it when she gets to college or find more acting roles so she can get a head start on her dream career!

      I encourage it!

      God bless!

  46. QUESTION:
    How To Become an Actress at 14?
    Hi, I'm 14 and acting is my all time biggest dream. I've done acting before in camps and legit programs with acting. But I wanna be on TV in movies that'll be on the big screen. I know I have to get an agent and stuff but I dunno where to get one. So can anyone help me? I don't want any phony stuff where you're faking to be someone, I'd really like to become an actress. My only concern of me acting is my voice, I have an unofficial accent and it may sound weird and un-comprehendible (if that's a word).

    • ANSWER:
      Your first step to be a professional actress at 14 is to talk to your parents. Professional acting is a business and your parents will have to be involved. Your parents will have to be willing to do the necessary research to understand the business end of acting and be the CEO of your career. They will need to understand the entire acting process, who the players are, what type of professional work is available where you live, what the different contracts in the industry are, when and if you should join an actor union, what the legal requirements there are for minors to work in the entertainment industry, things like that. They will also have to build a network of contacts in the industry to find out about opportunties for you.

      Here's a website that you and your parents can look at. It's maintained by a non-profit organization for families in the entertainment industry:

      http://www.bizparentz.org/

      While your parents do that research, you can work on improving your acting skills. Continue taking acting classes. Voice lessons and dance lessons could be fun too. Keep auditioning for what you can in your area - school plays, community theater, or other local productions. Your parents could contact any film schools/programs in the area to see where they get actors for student films. Check the website for your local film commission to see what's happening in your area. Check into if there are any speech/drama clubs (or maybe starting one) so you could compete in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions. Read A LOT - plays and scripts, to keep an eye out for characters and monologues that you love and want to develop. Read other things - novels, short stories, poems - because an understanding of language and storytelling will help you as an actor. Play improv games with your friends, create your own home movies, put on your own productions Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      Then when both you and your parents are ready, you can consider looking for an agent. The bizparentz website has a whole "getting started" section to help you. There are also some helpful articles at the backstage.com website:

      http://www.backstage.com/topics/kids/

      Good luck.

  47. QUESTION:
    Oldest daughter wants to be actress when she grows up? This a good idea at 15?
    I have 3 kids 9, 12 and 15 and my oldest Veronica http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=14c7erk&s=6 wants to be an actress. She just started in a short film called "TEASED" about a girl 15 years who has two younger brothers and before school she ends up teasing and laughing at her 10 year old little brother about being adopted, and then there mom with her head in clouds sends him off to school only to picked on by the kids in his class. Feeling his not wanted at home or school he runs away on a journey only to have his family go find him before he discovers the true meaning of family. It's such a hart warming, sad and sometime funny story about dealing with issue of teasing and be teased my daughter did such a great job on screen I think the role of older sister Hayley was a perfect fit. We just found out she won a new young talent award for her role of Hayley at our local film festival as a mom she wants to do a lot more acting in the future.

    Do you think this was right first role and should Should I let my daughter go into acting this young even if she really good?

    • ANSWER:
      It's a good start I'd say.

      The program is this. While she's in high school, she needs to audition and take whatever parts she can get--indie films, community theatre, college shows (if they'll have her), high school shows. She also needs to get lesson in acting, dance, voice, and other show biz skills--and also to read lots of scripts and also books on acting by such masters as Uta Hagan or Bobby Lewis, or Stanislavski.

      To get into the acting profession, she'll most likely need to do a BFA program at a good university--there are exceptions, but that's how almost all actors get started. If she does lots of amateur acting at this age, she'll have a network of people who can help her pick a good program.

      Good luck!

  48. QUESTION:
    how can i convince my parents to give me acting lessons so i can be an actress?
    i really want to act on tv. its like my dream. but my parents dont want me to. he says im too "smart" to be an actress and its not a stable job... but if its my dream. shouldnt they accept it and help me? Please help me(:
    no i cant run away
    no i cant post anything on youtube either
    and no i dont want to wait until after college
    i want to be one now, a 14 year old...
    just something that can help them understand how much i want to be one
    and no hate pleasee...

    • ANSWER:
      If acting and performing is your dream - then focus on that. You don't have to have a professional career to be an actress. Talk to your parents about auditioning for school plays and community theater. If you like singing then maybe join a choir. Maybe join your school's speech/drama club and compete in the acting divisions in forensic competitions. If it's OK with your parents you could contact local film schools and see where they get their actors for student films. Maybe volunteer at film festivals or theaters in your area to get to know some people in the industry (volunteering is a good thing to do). Even if you don't become a professional actor, these things can help you gain confidence and public speaking skills are always good. Dance classes are a good way to get exercise. Extracurricular work is a good thing for kids to participate in.

      And maybe if you can keep your grades up while you participate in other things, your parents might be willing to pay for acting classes/lessons. If not, maybe you can save up money and pay for them yourself (if your parents will let you).

      Other things you can do include reading plays and scripts keeping an eye out for characters and monologues you love and want to develop. Read other things too - novels, short stories, poems. Understanding language and storytelling will help you in acting. Get together with friends and put on shows or make your own movies (you don't have to put them on youtube). Just have fun learning and growing as a person and as an actor. Your parents might be thrilled to see you doing things you love.

      If acting is your dream - then act. I gave you several options you have for that. But if you're wanting to be actress to be famous, popular, to get attention or things like that - your parents are right not to support you because you're only going to end up disappointed. Professional acting is a business and involves a lot more than acting lessons. You can't just show up at some open audition - that's not how the industry works. People are in the industry to make money, not make your dreams come true. So enjoy acting without the added pressure and competition of an acting career. Focus on building a reptuation as a good actor locally, at school, in your community, with your friends.

      And when you get older, you can do more research into what it takes to have a professional acting career - and get to understand the business end and the industry. Then you can make a decision if that is still your dream and something you want to pursue.

      Good luck.

  49. QUESTION:
    how to earn a union card and how to retain an agent?
    Im 16 , and i really want to start acting i have tryed auditiong for something called the event but it was a scam . iknow some actors like Dylan O'Brien all he had was an agent and the agent got him to start doing the mtv teen wolf series.. i live in boston, ma .. please helpp..

    • ANSWER:
      Again - if you want to have a professional career as a minor, your parents will have to be involved. (You may even need a work permit to legally work - http://www.mass.gov/ago/docs/workplace/parent-fact-sheet.pdf ).

      I don't know enough about Dylan O'Brien to know exactly how he came into acting. Different people come to it in different way. Sounds like he has talent and got lucky. Good for him! If he's really good and focuses on having an acting career then maybe he'll still be around 5 years from now. If not - hopefully he'll be doing something he loves. (Or he'll pop up on some "Where are they now" or "celebrity" realty show in ten years.) Remember every acting job is temporary - just because someone is "famous" right now doesn't mean they'll always be there. One role does not a career make. Plus for every one of him there are literally THOUSANDS of other kids who are just as talented who don't get that lucky.

      So the question becomes - how to you want to approach an acting career? Do you want to wait around and try to be discovered or do you want to become a really good actor and learn the business end of things and succeed that way (the way MOST professional actors succeed)?

      You start an acting career by taking classes and getting experience where you can. Look into acting classes. Check into voice and dance lessons too. Audition for what you can - school plays, community theater and the like. Perform with choirs, dance troupes, or other performing groups,. Read a ton of plays and scripts, keeping an eye out for monologues and characters you love and want to develop. Maybe perform those for your parents and friends. Read other things too (novels, poems, short stories). Understanding language and storytelling will help you with your acting.

      Look into speech/drama clubs and competing in the acting divisions of forensic competitions. Contact local film schools and ask about how they find actors for student films and check out those sources. Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunities are there. Get together with friends and play improv games, make your own home movies or web series or put on your own show. Basically have fun learning and growing as an actor.

      While you do that, your parents can research the business end of an acting career. Once you're both ready you can consider looking into getting an agent.

      Understand that you're not going to be "discovered". That's not how the industry works. Professional acting is a business and you'll have to treat it as such. You don't have to have a professional career as a child to have one as an adult. If you think you might want an acting career, you can look into high quality acting schools/programs with well respected instructors for after high school. It's not required for a professional career, but they can help improve your skill and is a good way to start to network and make contacts in the industry.

      As an overview, SOME of what you'll need for a professional acting career:

      * Talent
      * Quality acting training/classes
      * Experience (At first you'll have to start with low-to-no pay jobs. Check out websites like actorsaccess.com, backstage.com, castingnetworks.com and others for lists of jobs you can try for without an agent.)
      * Professional head shot
      * Professional acting resume
      * Acting reel (video of your on-screen work)
      * A licensed talent agent (good roles are cast through talent agents - not open audition or websites)
      * Several well-developed monologues for auditions and good auditioning skills
      * To be a member of an actor's union (SAG-AFTRA for screens) or at least an understanding of how unions work. (see http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Au_DdHLS8JIn1urIF7xLyP0jzKIX;_ylv=3?qid=20130203182050AAATm1C for some more information.)
      * An understanding of the business end of acting. There are a lot of scams/ripoffs out there, so make sure you understand how things work.
      * A good network of connections in the industry.
      * A strong foundation and healthy ways to cope with the stress of trying to work professionally. You need to be able to handle rejection, competition and instability.

  50. QUESTION:
    What movie is this? A man steals script from kid?
    A kid writes a script or a story or something for school and a movie producer steals it and makes it into a huge hit so the kid tries to prove that it was stolen from him.

    I remember one scene where the kid and his friends turn the man blue by changing his shampoo and putting dye in his pool.
    Another part I remember is a velcro wall and suit where the kids are playing.
    anyone?

    • ANSWER:
      The movie you are thinking of is "Big Fat Liar"

      Here's a short summary:

      A take on the classic tale 'The Boy Who Cried Wolf', this is the story of a 14-year-old boy named Jason Shephard who lies for the fun of it. Jason loses an important story assignment entitled 'Big Fat Liar' in movie producer Marty Wolf's limo, which Wolf then turns into a film. When Jason sees a movie preview of his story, he and best friend Kaylee go to Los Angeles to make Wolf confess to using Jason's story as well as to clear Jason's name and to get him out of having to attend summer school. The teen liar then has to match wits with Wolf, who also turns out to be a big liar.


short film scripts for kids